Making mice : standardizing animals for American biomedical research, 1900-1955 / Karen A. Rader.

Author
Rader, Karen A. (Karen Ann), 1967- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2004.
Description
xviii, 299 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Summary note
"Throughout Making Mice, Karen Rader explains how the story of mouse research illuminates our understanding of key issues in the history of science such as the role of model organisms in furthering scientific thought. Ultimately genetically standardized mice became icons of standardization in biomedicine by successfully negotiating the tension between the natural and the man-made in experimental practice." "This book will appeal not only to historians of science but also to biologists and medical researchers."--BOOK JACKET.
Notes
Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral)--Indiana University, 1995.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. [269]-292) and index.
Contents
Introduction: Why Mice? -- Ch. 1. Mice, Medicine, and Genetics: From Pet Rodents to Research Materials (1900-21) -- Ch. 2. Experiment and Change: Institutionalizing Inbred Mice (1922-30) -- Ch. 3. Mice for Sale: Commodifying Research Animals (1930-33) -- Ch. 4. A New Deal for Mice: Biomedicine as Big Science (1933-40) -- Ch. 5. RxMouse: JAX Mice in Cancer Research (1938-55) -- Ch. 6. Mouse Genetics as Public Policy: Radiation Risk in Cold War America (1946-56) -- Epilogue: Animals and the New Biology: Oncomouse and Beyond.
ISBN
0691016364 (cloth : alk. paper)
LCCN
2003054715
OCLC
52388042
RCP
C - O