Revolution and the multiclass coalition in Nicaragua / Mark Everingham.

Author
Everingham, Mark, 1962- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh Press, [1996], ©1996.
Description
xvi, 218 pages ; 24 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Pitt Latin American series. [More in this series]
Summary note
  • In July 1979, people of almost every social and economic class actively participated in the overthrow of Somoza by contributing their might, minds, or money to collective action. How and why did such disparate social groups form a successful revolutionary alliance?
  • To explain when and why elite groups perceived a need for complete political change, Everingham interviewed Nicaraguans who held or continue to hold positions in government and in political, economic, and professional organizations. He delved into business archives, used content analysis of the newspaper La Prensa, and studied the political diary of Pedro Joaquin Chamorro to document the effectiveness of the mainstream opposition movement on the eve of the Sandinista insurrection.
  • Everingham concludes that cross-class cooperation resulted from deliberate efforts to cultivate mutual trust and establish communication among those who would find little common ground under peaceful or less threatening political conditions.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
  • 1. Introduction: The Nicaraguan Revolution in Perspective
  • 2. Theories of Revolution and Revolutionary Coalitions
  • 3. Defining the Dynasty and Changing Elite Relations, 1950-1962
  • 4. Business, Politics, and Agro-Industrialization, 1963-1972
  • 5. Class Structure and Political Organization: Land, Labor, and Opposition
  • 6. The Political Roots of Cross-Class Cooperation, 1973-1977
  • 7. The Alliance of Convenience and Necessity, 1978-1980
  • 8. Conclusions and Reflections.
ISBN
  • 0822939339 (alk. paper)
  • 0822955903 (pbk. : alk. paper)
LCCN
95046278
OCLC
33403791
RCP
C - S
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