The thwarting of Laplace's demon : arguments against the mechanistic world-view / Richard Green.

Author
Green, Richard, Ph. D. [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1995.
Description
xii, 229 pages ; 23 cm

Details

Subject(s)
Summary note
  • Are human activities nothing but an outcome of mechanistic brain processes? The answer to this question is crucial to our general conception of the world. For if our actions are not determined in a mechanistic way we should have to radically revise the prevailing world picture associated with modern science. That just such a radical revision is needed is the central theme of this book.
  • The many arguments given in support draw on analyses firstly of human language, intelligence, learning and consciousness, and secondly of the key attributes of life. The aim is to bring out the manifold (though related) failings of the mechanistic world picture. Yet the gain in understanding thereby sought is not purely philosophical in Wittgenstein's sense: it does not leave everything as it is.
  • On the contrary, the implications not only for traditional philosophical issues - such as the mind/body problem - but for neuropsychology, biology and biophysics.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. 218-222) and index.
Contents
  • 1. The Challenge of Laplace's Demon
  • 2. The Continuing Failure to Explain Life Mechanistically
  • 3. Reasons for Thinking that Life is Non-Laplacean
  • 4. The Logic of Life
  • 5. The Behaviour of Lower Organisms
  • 6. The Infinite Resourcefulness of Human Intelligence
  • 7. The Logic of Learning
  • 8. The Mind
  • 9. Indeterministic Causality
  • 10. Vitalism Reappraised
  • 11. The Non-Laplacean Underpinnings of Embryogenesis
  • 12. Non-Laplacean Evolution
  • Appendix: On Brains and Codes.
ISBN
  • 0333627660
  • 0312124724
LCCN
94043401
OCLC
31608917
RCP
C - S
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