The influence of natural religion on the temporal happiness of mankind / Jeremy Bentham ; introduction by Delos McKown.

Author
Beauchamp, Philip [Browse]
Uniform title
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2003.
Description
164 p. ; 22 ccm.

Details

Subject(s)
Natural theology [Browse]
Related name
Series
Great books in philosophy. [More in this series]
Summary note
"This little-known work by Jeremy Bentham, the great English philosopher and originator of utilitarianism, was considered so controversial when it was first published in 1822 that Bentham used the pseudonym of "Philip Beauchamp." The focus of this critical treatise is "natural religion," a school of thought that maintained one could use human reason alone, unaided by faith, to deduce the will of God from the natural order. As the creator of a system that defined human happiness in terms of a moral calculus based on pleasure and pain, Bentham was quite skeptical of all claims of religion. Thus it is not surprising that the results of Bentham's analysis of the influence of natural religion on human happiness are decidedly negative." "Divided into two parts, Bentham first criticizes the major tenets of belief in a supreme being and its alleged benefits to humanity. In the second part, Bentham catalogues the many ways in which natural religion harms both individuals and society as a whole."--Jacket.
Notes
Originally published: Analysis of the influence of natural religion on the temporal happiness of mankind. London : R. Carlile, 1822. With new introd.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN
1591020336 (alk. paper)
LCCN
^^2002031851
OCLC
50606452
RCP
H - S
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Supplementary Information