Demanding the Cherokee Nation : Indian autonomy and American culture, 1830-1900 / Andrew Denson.

Author
Denson, Andrew [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2004.
Description
327 p. ; 23 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Indians of the Southeast. [More in this series]
Summary note
"Demanding the Cherokee Nation examines nineteenth-century Cherokee political rhetoric to address an enigma in American Indian history: the contradiction between the sovereignty of Indian nations and the political weakness of Indian communities. Making use of a rich collection of petitions, appeals, newspaper editorials, and other public records, Andrew Denson describes the ways in which Cherokees represented their people and their nation to non-Indians after their forced removal to Indian Territory in the 1830s. He argues that Cherokee writings on nationhood document a decades-long effort by tribal leaders to find a new model for American Indian relations in which Indian nations could coexist with a modernizing United States."--BOOK JACKET.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-319) and index.
Contents
Introduction: A Cherokee literature of Indian nationhood -- The long and intimate connection -- The Civil War and Cherokee nationhood -- The Cherokees' peace policy -- The Okmulgee Council -- The Indian international fairs -- Demagogues, political bummers, scalawags, and railroad corporations -- This new phase of the Indian question.
Other title(s)
Project Muse UPCC books
ISBN
0803217269 (cloth : alk. paper)
LCCN
^^2004014196
OCLC
55798023
RCP
H - O
Statement on language in description
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