Nature's teleological order and God's providence : are they compatible with chance, free will, and evil? / Paul Weingartner.

Author
Weingartner, Paul [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Boston ; Berlin : De Gruyter, [2015]
Description
xvi, 322 pages ; 24 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
  • Philosophische Analyse ; Bd. 61. [More in this series]
  • Philosophische Analyse, 2198-2066 ; Band 61 = Philosophical analysis ; volume 61
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (pages 273-281) and index.
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.1. Arguments Contra -- 1.1.1. First argument -- 1.1.2. Second argument -- 1.1.3. Third argument -- 1.2. Argument Pro -- 1.3. Proposed Answer -- 1.3.1. Definition of 'providence' -- 1.3.2. Possibility of Providence -- 1.3.3. Remark on terminology -- 1.3.4. Result of chapter 1 -- 1.4. Answer to the Objections -- 1.4.1. (to 1.1.1) -- 1.4.2. (to 1.1.2) -- 1.4.3. (to 1.1.3) -- 2.1. Arguments Contra -- 2.1.1. First argument -- 2.1.2. Second argument -- 2.2. Argument Pro -- 2.3. Proposed Answer -- 2.3.1. Result of chapter 2 -- 2.4. Answer to the Objections -- 2.4.1. (to 2.1.1) -- 2.4.2. (to 2.1.2) -- 3.1. Arguments Contra -- 3.1.1. First argument -- 3.1.2. Second argument -- 3.1.3. Third argument -- 3.2. Argument Pro -- 3.3. Proposed Answer -- 3.3.1. Result of chapter 3 -- 3.4. Answer to the Objections -- 3.4.1. (to 3.1.1) -- 3.4.2. (to 3.1.2) -- 3.4.3. (to 3.1.3) -- 4.1. Arguments Contra -- 4.1.1. First argument -- 4.1.2. Second argument -- 4.2. Argument Pro -- 4.3. Proposed Answer -- 4.3.1. Change by movement -- 4.3.2. Thermodynamic change -- 4.3.3. Quantum-mechanical change -- 4.3.4. Result of chapter 4 -- 4.4. Answer to the Objections -- 4.4.1. (to 4.1.1) -- 4.4.2. (to 4.1.2) -- 4.5. Conclusion -- 5.1. Arguments Contra -- 5.1.1. First argument -- 5.1.2. Second argument -- 5.2. Argument Pro -- 5.3. Proposed Answer -- 5.3.1. Things and systems -- 5.3.2. Change and reversibility -- 5.3.3. Order -- 5.3.4. Becoming -- 5.3.5. Teleological order -- 5.3.6. Values and goals in non-living systems -- 5.3.7. Result of chapter 5 -- 5.4. Answer to the Objections -- 5.4.1. (to 5.1.1) -- 5.4.2. (to 5.1.2) -- 5.5. Conclusion -- 6.1. Arguments Contra -- 6.1.1. First argument -- 6.1.2. Second argument -- 6.1.3. Third argument -- 6.2. Argument Pro -- 6.3. Proposed Answer -- 6.3.1. Extreme positions -- 6.3.2. Randomness in arithmetic and geometry -- 6.3.3. Kinds of chance and randomness concerning dynamical laws of nature -- 6.3.4. Kinds of chance and randomness concerning statistical laws of nature -- 6.3.5. Complexity and randomness of sequences -- 6.3.6. Kinds of chance and randomness w.r.t. structure and order -- 6.3.7. Kinds of chance and randomness w.r.t. teleological order -- 6.3.8. Results of chapter 6 -- 6.4. Answer to the Objections -- 6.4.1. (to 6.1.1) -- 6.4.2. (to 6.1.2) -- 6.4.3. (to 6.1.3) -- 7.1. Arguments Contra -- 7.1.1. First argument -- 7.1.2. Second argument -- 7.2. Arguments Pro -- 7.2.1. First argument -- 7.2.2. Second argument -- 7.3. Proposed Answer -- 7.3.1. Living system (Biosystem) -- 7.3.2. Order and teleological order in living systems -- 7.3.3. Values in living systems -- 7.3.3.1. Primary, secondary and basic good of a living system -- 7.3.3.2. Goods and values -- 7.3.4. Values concerning the history of is -- 7.3.5. Higher-level teleological order -- 7.3.6. Higher human values -- 7.3.6.1. Different kinds of higher values -- 7.3.6.2. Values and norms -- 7.3.7. Projected teleological order -- 7.3.8. Result of chapter 7 -- 7.4. Answer to the Objections -- 7.4.1. (to 7.1.1) -- 7.4.2. (to 7.1.2) -- 7.5. Conclusion -- 8.1. Arguments Contra -- 8.1.1. First argument -- 8.1.2. Second argument -- 8.2. Argument Pro -- 8.3. Proposed Answer -- 8.3.1. The question of randomness of the DNA-sequence -- 8.3.2. The question of randomness and chance in the emergence of the DNA-sequence -- 8.3.3. The question of the randomness of mutation -- 8.3.4. Randomness and chance in the emergence of higher-level biological systems -- 8.3.5. Randomness concerning the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium -- 8.3.6. Chance and randomness concerning goals and teleological order -- 8.3.7. Conclusion concerning chance and randomness -- 8.3.8. Results of chapter 8 -- 8.4. Answer to the Objections -- 8.4.1. (to 8.1.1) -- 8.4.2. (to 8.1.2) -- 9.1. Arguments Contra -- 9.1.1. First argument -- 9.1.2. Second argument -- 9.1.3. Third argument -- 9.1.4. Fourth argument -- 9.1.5. Fifth argument -- 9.2. Argument Pro -- 9.3. Proposed Answer -- 9.3.1. Providence is compatible with any kind of order which is realized in the universe -- 9.3.2. Providence is compatible with any kind of chance which is realized in the universe -- 9.3.3. Result of chapter 9 -- 9.4. Answer to the Objections -- 9.4.1. (to 9.1.1) -- 9.4.2. (to 9.1.2) -- 9.4.3. (to 9.1.3) -- 9.4.4. (to 9.1.4) -- 9.4.5. (to 9.1.5) -- 10.1. Arguments Contra -- 10.1.1. First argument -- 10.1.2. Second argument -- 10.1.3. Third argument -- 10.1.4. Fourth argument -- 10.1.5. Fifth argument -- 10.2. Argument Pro -- 10.3. Proposed Answer -- 10.3.1. Definition of 'providence' -- 10.3.2. Omnitemporal and temporal states of affairs (Df 10.1(b)) -- 10.3.3. Both states of affairs, those which hold for all times and those which hold for some time, come under God's providence -- 10.3.4. Result of chapter 10 -- 10.4. Answer to the Objections -- 10.4.1. (to 10.1.1) -- 10.4.2. (to 10.1.2) -- 10.4.3. (to 10.1.3) -- 10.4.4. (to 10.1.4 and 10.1.5) -- 11.1. Arguments Contra -- 11.1.1. First argument -- 11.1.2. Second argument -- 11.2. Argument Pro -- 11.3. Proposed Answer -- 11.3.1. Does God know all laws and constants of the universe? -- 11.3.2. Does God know all states, events, processes and initial conditions in the universe? -- 11.3.3. God's knowledge of contingent future events -- 11.3.4. Results of chapter 11 -- 11.4. Answer to the Objections -- 11.4.1. (to 11.1.1) -- 11.4.2. (to 11.1.2) -- 12.1. Arguments Contra -- 12.1.1. First argument -- 12.1.2. Second argument -- 12.2. Argument Pro -- 12.3. Proposed Answer -- 12.3.1. God permits order and teleological order -- 12.3.2. God is not all-willing -- 12.3.3. God's will is always fulfilled -- 12.3.4. God wills order and teleological order -- 12.3.5. God wills and permits chance and randomness -- 12.3.6. Result of chapter 12 -- 12.4. Answer to the Objections -- 12.4.1. (to 12.1.1 and 12.1.2) -- 13.1. Arguments Contra -- 13.1.1. First argument -- 13.1.2. Second argument -- 13.1.3. Third argument -- 13.1.4. Fourth argument -- 13.2. Argument Pro -- 13.3. Proposed Answer -- 13.3.1. The universe as a whole -- 13.3.2. The universe of order and chance -- 13.3.3. Self-organization -- 13.3.4. Natural selection -- 13.3.5. Development -- 13.3.6. Evolution -- 13.3.7. Transition from species A to variation A' -- 13.3.8. Transition from species A to species B -- 13.3.9. Heredity -- 13.3.10. What cannot be caused by creatures (internal causes of the universe) on principal grounds must be caused by God and his providence -- 13.3.10.1. Leibniz's answer -- 13.3.10.2. Can the laws or theories of physics be complete? -- 13.3.11. Result of chapter 13 -- 13.4. Answer to the Objections -- 13.4.1. (to 13.1.1) -- 13.4.2. (to 13.1.2) -- 13.4.3. (to 13.1.3) Everlasting universe -- 13.4.4. (to 13.1.4) Self-contained universe -- 14.1. Arguments Contra -- 14.1.1. First argument -- 14.1.2. Second argument -- 14.1.3. Third argument -- 14.2. Argument Pro -- 14.3. Proposed Answer -- 14.3.1. Are biological processes teleological? -- 14.3.2. Are non-biological processes teleological? -- 14.3.3. Can all living systems be integrated into a network of goals extrinsic to the living system? -- 14.3.4. Can all non-living systems be integrated into a network of goals? -- 14.3.5. Can all obtaining states of affairs be integrated into a network of goals? -- 14.3.5.1. Carbon-based life -- 14.3.5.2. Evolutionarily stable strategy -- 14.3.5.3. Queen Elizabeth l's goal -- 14.3.5.4. Children's understanding of goals -- 14.3.6. Functional explanation -- 14.3.7. Reasons for integration into a network of goals -- 14.3.8. Result of chapter 14 -- 14.4. Answer to the Objections -- 14.4.1. (to 14.1.1) -- 14.4.2. (to 14.1.2) -- 14.4.3. (to 14.1.3) -- 15.1. Arguments Contra -- 15.1.1. First argument -- 15.1.2. Second argument -- 15.1.3. Third argument -- 15.1.4. Fourth argument -- 15.1.5. Fifth argument -- 15.1.6. Sixth argument -- 15.2. Argument Pro -- 15.3. Proposed Answer -- 15.3.1. Determinism and indeterminism -- 15.3.2. Confusions concerning determinism, causality and prediction -- 15.3.3. Attacks on men's free will decision: Neuronal Determinism -- 15.3.4. Degrees of freedom on different levels -- 15.3.5. Definition of free will and of free will decision -- 15.3.5.1. Presuppositions of free will -- 15.3.5.2. Definition of 'free will' -- 15.3.5.3. Definition of 'free will decision' -- 15.3.6. Compatibility of nature's order and free will -- 15.3.7. Compatibility of providence and free will -- 15.3.7.1. God's knowledge and free will -- 15.3.7.2. Men's free will and God's will or permission -- 15.3.7.3. Men's free will and the causation by God or by creatures -- 15.3.7.4. Men's free will and the direction to some goal -- 15.3.8. Conclusion -- 15.3.9. Result of chapter 15 -- 15.4. Answer to the Objections -- 15.4.1. (to 15.1.1) -- 15.4.2. (to 15.1.2) -- 15.4.3. (to 15.1.3) -- 15.4.4. (to 15.1.4) -- 15.4.5. (to 15.1.5) -- 15.4.6. (to 15.1.6) -- 16.1. Arguments Contra -- 16.1.1. First argument -- 16.1.2. Second argument -- 16.1.3. Third argument -- 16.1.4. Fourth argument -- 16.1.5. Fifth argument -- 16.1.6. Sixth argument -- 16.2. Arguments Pro -- 16.2.1. First argument
ISBN
9781614518914 (hd.bd.)
OCLC
888165541
RCP
H - S
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