Efficiencies from applying a rotational equipping strategy / Christopher G. Pernin ... et al.

Author
Pernin, Christopher G., 1973- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Santa Monica : Rand Corporation, 2011
Description
xxiii, 60 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Related name
Series
  • Rand Corporation monograph series ; MG-1092-A. [More in this series]
  • Rand Corporation monograph series ; MG-1092-A
Summary note
To meet the demands of the past decade of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army has adopted a rotational strategy based on the Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) model. While the Army has adapted many of its policies to the ARFORGEN model, the equipping policies still largely reflect Cold War tradition to provide active, reserve, and National Guard units with 100 percent of their equipment at all times during the ARFORGEN cycle. This report uses a simulation model to analyze how the Army might reduce equipment in early phases of the ARFORGEN cycle, how those changes might be applied across Army units and equipment, and how those changes might affect near- and far-term budgets. The report finds that reducing overall Army authorization levels can reduce near-term procurements totaling billions of dollars across the Future Years Defense Program.--Cover.
Notes
"The research described in this report was sponsored by the United States Army under contract No. W74V8H-06-C-0001."--T.p. verso.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. 59-60).
Contents
The Army's Rotational Equipping Strategy -- Demands on the Rotational Force -- Applying the Rotational Equipping Strategy -- Conclusions -- Appendix: Modeling the Rotational Equipping Strategy.
Other format(s)
Also available online (http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG1092.html).
ISBN
  • 0833052004
  • 9780833052001
OCLC
712127581
RCP
H - S
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