Flaws and ceilings : price controls and the damage they cause / edited by Christopher Coyne and Rachel Coyne.

Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
  • London : Iea, Institute of Economic Affairs, 2015.
  • ©2015
Description
xxi, 198 pages ; 22 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Editor
Series
Summary note
Price controls across many sectors are currently being hotly debated. New controls in the housing market, more onerous minimum wages, minimum prices for alcohol, and freezes on energy prices are very high up the agenda of most politicians at the moment. Even without any further controls, wages, university fees, railway fares and many financial products already have their prices at least partly determined by politicians rather than by supply and demand in the market. Indeed, barely a sector of the UK economy is unaffected in one way or another by government controls on prices. This book demonstrates why economists do not like price controls and shows why they are widely regarded as being amongst the most damaging political interventions in markets. The authors analyse, in a very readable fashion, the damage they cause. Crucially, the authors also explain why, despite universal criticism from economists, price controls are so popular amongst politicians. This excellent book, edited by Christopher Coyne and Rachel Coyne, should be of great value to all those with an interest in minimum wages and other forms of price control.-- Provided by publisher.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references.
Contents
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The economics of price controls
  • 3. Price ceilings : ancient and modern
  • 4. The simple economics of wage floors
  • 5. The flaws in rent ceilings
  • 6. Energy price caps
  • 7. Regulation of rail fares
  • 8. Price ceilings in financial markets
  • 9. University price controls
  • 10. Minimum unit pricing.
ISBN
  • 9780255367011 ((paperback))
  • 0255367015 ((paperback))
LCCN
2014482721
OCLC
909300156
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view