Grace and agency in Paul and Second Temple Judaism : interpreting the transformation of the heart / by Kyle B. Wells.

Author
Wells, Kyle B. (Kyle Brandon), 1980- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
  • Leiden ; Boston : Brill, [2015]
  • ©2015
Description
x, 374 pages ; 25 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
  • Supplements to Novum Testamentum ; v. 157. [More in this series]
  • Novum Testamentum, Supplements, 0167-9732 ; volume 157
Summary note
"Following recent intertextual studies, Kyle B. Wells examines how descriptions of 'heart-transformation' in Deut 30, Jer 31-32 and Ezek 36 informed Paul and his contemporaries' articulations about grace and agency. Beyond advancing our understanding of how these restoration narratives were interpreted in the LXX, the Dead Sea literature, Baruch, Jubilees, 2 Baruch, 4 Ezra, and Philo, Wells demonstrates that while most Jews in this period did not set divine and human agency in competition with one another, their constructions differed markedly and this would have contributed to vehement disagreements among them. While not sui generis in every respect, Paul's own convictions about grace and agency appear radical due to the way he reconfigures these concepts in relation to Christ."-- Publisher description.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
Part 1. Jewish scriptures : restoration agency in Deuteronomy, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. Deuteronomy 30 : God and Israel in the drama of restoration -- Heart transformation in the prophets : Jeremiah and Ezekiel -- Part 2. Early Jewish interpretation and theology. The Septuagint -- The Dead Sea scrolls -- The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha -- Philo -- Part 3. Paul. Paul's reading of Deuteronomy 30 in Romans 2:17-29 -- Paul's reading of restoration : further considerations -- Paul's reading of restoration outside Romans -- Part 4. Conclusions. Conclusions.
ISBN
  • 9789004277281 (hardback : alk. paper)
  • 9004277285 (hardback : alk. paper)
LCCN
2014026701
OCLC
889181202
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