Categorization inside and outside the laboratory [electronic resource] : essays in honor of Douglas L. Medin / edited by Woo-Kyoung Ahn ... [et al.].

Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c2005.
Description
xx, 317 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Related name
Series
Summary note
"This book presents the state of knowledge in the study of categorization. As the subtitle indicates, the essays were written to honor Douglas L. Medin of Northwestern University, who has had a long and distinguished career in the field of cognitive psychology, especially in the area of categorization. The purpose of the book is to explore the methodologies and theoretical perspective that Medin developed to bridge the gap between naturally created and laboratory-induced concepts. The body of the book is divided into four parts. Part I presents five chapters that explore the relationship between culture and our conceptualization of the world and inferences that people make on the basis of such conceptualization. Part II exemplifies a recent move in categorization research by examining psychologically different kinds of categories. Part III highlights the importance of interactions with category members in shaping the ways in which category information is conceptualized. Part IV covers the relations between concepts and theories. The two chapters in this section both illustrate how powerfully the theories or knowledge that people have about the world influence categorization"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2005. Available via the World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement.
Other format(s)
Also issued in print.
Other title(s)
PsycBOOKS.
ISBN
1591472490 (print)
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view