Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders [electronic resource] : A Study of Intervention Practices for Youth in Seven Cities in the United States, 1987-1991 Malcolm Klein, Cheryl Maxson

Format
Data file
Language
English
Εdition
ICPSR Version, 2005-11-04.
Published/​Created
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 1994.
Description
5 data files + machine-readable documentation (text) + SAS setup file(s) + SPSS setup file(s) + Stata setup file(s) + SAS transport + SPSS portable + Stata system + data collection instruments

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Restrictions note
Use of these data are restricted to Princeton University students, faculty, and staff for non-commercial statistical analysis and research purposes only.
Summary note
This data collection focuses on status offenders--those juveniles who commit acts (such as running away, habitual truancy, and possession of alcohol) that are forbidden to minors but not to adults. The purpose of this study was to connect legislative intent, service delivery systems, and youth responses in order to provide guidelines for future status offender legislation and practice. In the selection of sampling sites, three categories of intervention philosophy were represented: (1) deterrence, which recommends sanctions and control through the juvenile justice system, (2) treatment, which recommends emotional adjustment strategies through the community mental health system, and (3) normalization, which recommends little or no professional response. Respondents from youth service agencies in seven cities in the United States were asked about service delivery system characteristics (such as types of referral sources, how often they were used, and length of client service period), organizational characteristics (such as public versus private auspices, sources of funding, and educational level of staff), and youth characteristics (such as family situation, school status, and educational attainment of principal adults in the home). Demographic variables for status offenders included gender, race, age, and type of residence. Interviews with youths were also conducted and included a self-concept scale, by which youths could categorize themselves as delinquent, disturbed, and/or conforming. The units of analysis for this study are the individual and the youth service agency.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/06039.xml
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2006-09-15.
Type of data
5 data files + machine-readable documentation (text) + SAS setup file(s) + SPSS setup file(s) + Stata setup file(s) + SAS transport + SPSS portable + Stata system + data collection instruments
Time and place of event
Start: 1987; and end: 1991.
Geographic coverage
United States
Funding information
United States Department of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 87-JN-CX-0001
System details
Mode of access: Internet.
Methodology note
Universe: Status offenders aged 12 to 17 in the United States.
Contents
Part 1: Agency Screening Survey Data; Part 2: Status Conduct Survey Data; Part 3: Church Screening Survey Data; Part 4: School Screening Survey Data; Part 5: Youth Interview Data; Part 6: SAS Data Definition Statements for Agency Screening Survey Data; Part 7: SAS Data Definition Statements for Status Conduct Survey Data; Part 8: SAS Data Definition Statements for Church Screening Survey Data; Part 9: SAS Data Definition Statements for School Screening Survey Data; Part 10: SAS Data Definition Statements for Youth Interview Data
Other format(s)
Also available as downloadable files.
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Supplementary Information