Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in the United States, 1997-2000 [electronic resource] / Richard J. Estes, Neil Alan Weiner

Format
Data file
Language
English
Εdition
ICPSR Version, 2006-03-30.
Published/​Created
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor] 2003.
Description
2 data files + machine-readable documentation (PDF) + SAS setup file(s) + SPSS setup file(s) + Stata setup file(s) + SAS transport + SPSS portable + Stata system

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Restrictions note
Use of these data are restricted to Princeton University students, faculty, and staff for non-commercial statistical analysis and research purposes only.
Summary note
This project undertook the systematic collection of first-generation data concerning the nature, extent, and seriousness of child sexual exploitation (CSE) in the United States. The project was organized around the following research objectives: (1) identification of the nature, extent, and underlying causes of CSE and the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) occurring in the United States, (2) identification of those subgroups of children that were at the greatest risk of being sexually exploited, (3) identification of subgroups of adult perpetrators of sex crimes against children, and (4) identification of the modes of operation and other methods used by organized criminal units to recruit children into sexually exploitative activities. The study involved surveying senior staff members of nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government organizations (GOs) in the United States known to be dealing with persons involved in the transnational trafficking of children for sexual purposes. Part 1 consists of survey data from nongovernment organizations. These were local child and family agencies serving runaway and homeless youth. Part 2 consists of survey data from government organizations. These organizations were divided into local, state, and federal agencies. Local organizations included municipal law enforcement, county law enforcement, prosecutors, public defenders, and corrections. State organizations included state child welfare directors, prosecutors, and public defenders. Federal organizations included the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal Public Defenders, Immigration and Naturalization Service, United States Attorneys, United States Customs, and the United States Postal Service. Variables in Parts 1 and 2 include the organization's city, state, and ZIP code, the type of services provided or type of law enforcement agency, how the agency wa... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03366.xml
Notes
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2006-09-15.
Type of data
2 data files + machine-readable documentation (PDF) + SAS setup file(s) + SPSS setup file(s) + Stata setup file(s) + SAS transport + SPSS portable + Stata system
Time and place of event
Start: 1997; and end: 2000.
Geographic coverage
United States
Funding information
United States Department of Justice. NationalInstitute of Justice. 99-IJ-CX-0030
System details
Mode of access: Internet.
Methodology note
  • Data source: Data were collected with mailback questionnaires.
  • Universe: Government and nongovernment agencies in the United States that dealt with persons involved in the transnational trafficking of children for sexual purposes.
Contents
Part 1: Nongovernment Organization Survey Data; Part 2: Government Organization Survey Data
Other format(s)
Also available as downloadable files.
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Supplementary Information