Coping with the cold : heating strategies for Eastern Europe and Central Asia's urban poor / Julian A. Lampietti, Anke S. Meyer.

Author
Lampietti, Julian A. [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Washington, D.C. : World Bank, ©2002.
Description
vii, 57 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
  • World Bank technical paper ; no. 529. [More in this series]
  • World Bank technical paper. Europe and Central Asia environmentally and socially sustainable rural development series [More in this series]
  • World Bank technical paper ; no. 529. Europe and Central Asia environmentally and socially sustainable development series [More in this series]
Summary note
Heating is a critical issue for the livelihoods of Eastern Europe and Central Asia's people. The region's gold climate, the legacy of central planning, and the drop in household incomes over the past 10 years, influence profoundly the design of heating strategies for the urban poor. This paper provides new insights into how much energy people demand for heating, and how much they pay for it. Recommendations are suggested on how to design policies, and investment planning, that would enable all people (poor and non-poor) to access clean, affordable heating.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references.
Contents
  • 1. What is Unique about ECA
  • 2. Household Energy Use
  • 3. Household Demand for Heat
  • 4. Rethinking Heat Supply
  • 5. Providing Clean Heat in Fiscally-Sustainable Ways
  • Annexes
  • 1. Purchasing Power Parity and Exchange Rate Conversions
  • 2. Data Assumptions
  • 3. Household Energy Consumption Summary Statistics
  • 4. Social Costs of Heating Options
  • 5. How to Estimate the Demand for Heat
  • 6. Validity of Heat Demand Model
  • 7. Fixed Effects of Different Heating Techniques
  • 8. Key Technical Characteristics of District Heating Systems and Housing Stock in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • Figures
  • 1-1. Observed mean temperature January 1961 to January 1990, degrees Celsius
  • 1-2. Relative changes in energy prices and incomes in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, 1991-2000
  • 2-1. Per capita energy consumption in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • 2-2. Share of energy spending in household budgets in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • 2-3. Expenditure elasticity of energy demand
  • 3-1. Urban household heating fuel choices by welfare (income) quintile
  • 3-2. Predicted per capita heat and nonheat energy consumption in selected countries
  • 3-3. Predicted heat expenditure as a percentage of household expenditures
  • 3-4. Demand for heat in selected countries
  • 4-1. Costs of different heat supply options in Moldova
  • 4-2. Annual costs of different heating options for full heat service in Yerevan, Armenia
  • 4-3. Cost of district heating per capita at various effective indoor temperatures compared with national GDP and official wages per capita in Moldova
  • 4-4. Fuel costs as share of total heat costs for different heat supply options and demand levels, Yerevan, Armenia
  • 4-5. Yerevan: Average cost of heating for high and low demand
  • Tables
  • 2-1. Urban network energy use in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • 2-2. Urban non-network energy use in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • 2-3. Energy prices in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
  • 3-1. Self-reported temperatures and heating expenditures in Armenia, 2000
  • 4-1. Payback times for energy efficiency investments in buildings
  • 4-2. Typical cost of heat metering and individual controls in apartments.
ISBN
  • 0821353284
  • 9780821353288
LCCN
2002038079
OCLC
51020288
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