Rational induction, an analysis of the method of science and philosophy, by Homer H. Dubs, PH. D.

Author
Dubs, Homer H. (Homer Hasenpflug), 1892-1969 [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Chicago, Ill., University of Chicago Press [1930]
Description
510 pages diagrams 21 cm

Details

Subject(s)
Medium/​Support
8vo. rdabf
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
  • Part I. The urgency of the problem of knowledge : I. The present state of philosophy : 1. The confusion in contemporary philosophy ; 2. The failure to solve the problem of knowledge is the most important reason for confusion ; 3. Knowledge and opinion as compulsory and non-compulsory ; 4. Demonstration and proof ; 5. Other definitions of knowledge ; 6. Is philosophy knowledge or opinion? ; 7. Pragmatism, literary appeal, and dogmatic logical rigor ; 8. The need of searching for knowledge and finding how it is attained; the fundamental philosophical problem
  • II. The trilemma of method : 1. No new methods to be expected ; 2. Induction ; 3. Whewell's method ; 4. Deduction ; 5. The coherence theory ; 6. A priori truths ; 7. Necessary truths ; 8. Authoritarianism ; 9. Self-evident truths ; 10. Intuitions or mystical insight ; 11. The trilemma; turn to induction
  • III. The search for a method on philosophy : 1. The problem of method not the first problem ; 2. The Milesians ; 3. Parmenides ; 4. Socrates and Plato ; 5. Aristotle ; 6. Skepticism ; 7. Dogmatism and mysticism ; 8. Christianity ; 9. The opening of the modern period ; 10. The founders of modern science. ; 11. Later scientists, Newton ; 12. Descartes ; 13. Spinoza ; 14. Leibnitz ; 15. Empiricism ; 16. Locke ; 17. Berkeley ; 18. Hume ; 19. Kant ; 20. Fichte ; 21. Hegel ; 22. Schopenhauer ; 23. Later; the new ; 24. Inclusiveness ; 25. Analysis and description ; 26. Non-Euclidean geometry ; 27. Pragmatism ; 28. Probabilism ; 29. Conclusion; skepticism; downfall or logical reconstruction
  • Part II. The theory of rational induction : IV. Theories of induction : 1. The problem of logic ; 2. Epistemology ; 3. Induction by the aid of probability ; 4. Induction by enumeration ; 5. Other conceptions of induction ; 6. Methods must be analyzed not excogitated ; 7. Methods of discovery ; 8. Methods of verification ; 9. Our thesis as to the nature of induction
  • V. The hypothesis : 1. Definition of hypothesis ; 2. Its importance in discovery ; 3. Speculation ; 4. The source of hypotheses ; 5. Mathematical concepts ; 6. A limit of knowledge ; 7. New conceptions in philosophy ; 8. Logic concerns itself with the testing, not the formation of hypotheses ; 9. The use of hypotheses
  • VI. Deduction : 1. Definition of deduction ; 2. Deduction as a procedure of thought ; 3. Deduction broader than Aristotelian logic ; 4. The importance of deduction in rational induction ; 5. The lack of an exact definition of deductive rigor ; 6. Analysis of the Aristotelian syllogism ; 7. The canon of deduction ; 8. The validating proposition ; 9. A syllogism always contains five propositions ; 10. Aristotelian immediate inference ; 11. Non-syllogistic deduction similar to Aristotelian deduction ; 12. Non-syllogistic immediate inference ; 13. Examples of mathematical deduction ; 14. Classification of syllogisms ; 15. Relation of immediate inference to the syllogism ; 16. The proof of the canon ; 17. General proof of the syllogistic nature of deduction ; 18. The nature of deductive rigor ; 19. Definition and the indefinable ; 20. An instrument for discovering deductive presuppositions ; 21. The concrete universal as one proposition ; 22. The helplessness of purely deductive reasoning ; 23. The ideal of rationalism ; 24. Why not discovered previously? ; 25. Practical and theoretical attitudes to deduction ; 26. Geometry ; 27. Summary ; 28. Criticisms of the syllogism ; 29. Definition of logic ; 30. Systems ; 31. The proof of deductive methods ; 32. The source and nature of deductive implication ; 33. Checking the consequences of a hypothesis with experience
  • VII. Verification : 1. When is a hypothesis verified? ; 2. The general answer ; 3. Verification as elimination ; 4. The immediate description ; 5. Verification of a rational induction; general statement ; 6. Antecedents and consequences ; 7. Example from astronomy ; 8. How wide a range of verified deductions is necessary? ; 9. The fallacy of hasty generalization ; 10. The place of quantitative exactness in induction ; 11. Supplementary criteria of verification: possibility of verifiable deduction ; 12. The principle of the non-verification of otiose elements in a hypothesis ; 13. The principle of superimposition ; 14. Conceivability and logical absurdity ; 15. Prediction ; 16. The exception and the ad hoc hypothesis ; 17. Proof of the falsity of a hypothesis ; 18. The ultimate judges of truth and falsity ; 19. Examples of rational induction ; 20. Summary
  • VIII. The limited universal and other feature of inductive proof : 1. The limited universal ; 2. The law of parsimony ; 3 Empirical induction ; 4. Mill's canons ; 5. Description ; 6. Explanation ; 7. Causation ; 8. The cause and the conditions ; 9. Possibility and impossibility ; 10. All logical procedures are aspects of the one process of rational induction
  • IX. Is certainty possible? : 1. Attacks based upon merely empirical induction ; 2. Attacks based upon the uniformity of nature ; 3. Attacks based upon the theory that induction is exclusion ; 4. Attacks based upon the theory that hypothetical induction commits the fallacy of affirming the consequent ; 5. Attack that unambiguous determination of a hypothesis is impossible ; 6. Attack that induction depends upon the doubtful assumption of simplicity ; 7. Attack that uniformity is rarely obtainable ; 8. Attack that laws are only hypothetical ; 9. Attack that induction does not give accuracy ; 10. Does science deal only with probability? ; 11. The definition of knowledge ; 12. The compelling power of rational induction ; 13. The consequences of doubting the possibility of certainty
  • X. The demonstration of the rational inductive method : 1. The necessity of demonstrating a method of knowledge ; 2. Is such a demonstration a petitio? ; 3. The method of induction alone able to demonstrate itself ; 4. Do we prejudge the issue? ; 5. The procedure of our demonstration ; 6. The successful use of rational induction ; 7. Rational induction accounts for mistaken theories of knowledge. Deduction ; 8. Intuition ; 9. Authority ; 10. Faith ; 11. Coherence ; 12. Speculation ; 13. Pragmatism ; 14. Conclusion
  • Part III. Epistemological and metaphysical implications : XI. The use of rational induction in science and life : 1. Definition of science and epistemology ; 2. The perceptual judgment ; 3. It constitutes an insolvable difficulty for other logical theories ; 4. The foundation of knowledge ; 5. Either we must accept rational induction or fall into absolute skepticism ; 6. Orders of truth and the "fact" ; 7. The correctness of memory ; 8. The escape form fundamental skepticism ; 9. The scope of rational induction; in judgments of fact ; 10. In science; analysis and classification ; 11. In practical life and ethics: the practical judgment ; 12. In philosophy ; 13. The relation between truth and its object
  • XII. The nature of mathematics and probability : 1. The problem presented by mathematics ; 2. Pure mathematics ; 3. The requirements for a set of primitive propositions ; 4. Applied mathematics ; 5. The objects and truth of applied mathematics ; 6. Non-Euclidean geometrics ; 7. The algebras ; 8. Science and mathematics ; 9. The logical development of mathematics ; 10. Is probability subjective or objective? ; 11. The statistical nature of probability ; 12. Probability and possibility ; 13. The fundamental hypothesis of the theory of probability ; 14. The subjective theory of probability ; 15. Probability as applied or pure mathematics
  • XIII. The eternity of truth : 1. The uniformity of nature; its meaning ; 2. The eternity of truth ; 3. It does not validate empirical laws ; 4. A presupposition of all reasoning ; 5. Its proof ; 6. Universal causation
  • XIV. The transcendence of experience : 1. Phenomenalism ; 2. The proof of the possibility of transcendence ; 3. How is transcendence achieved? ; 4. The limits of knowledge ; 5. The object ; 6. The conventional object ; 7. The apparent object ; 8. The nature of the unity and continuity of an object
  • XV. Knowledge of other persons and of the external world : 1. Proof of the existence of other persons ; 2. The gap between minds ; 3. Solipsism ; 4. Intuitional theories of knowledge of other persons ; 5. The social verification of truth ; 6. The inner nature of persons ; 7. The reality of external objects ; 8. The meaning of existence ; 9. Primary, secondary, and other qualities ; 10. The real nature of external objects ; 11. Value and beauty ; 12. The unity of science ; 13. Rational realism ; 14. Retrospect.
LCCN
30014001
OCLC
561512
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view