A convex mirror : Schopenhauer's philosophy and the sciences / Marco Segala.

Author
Segala, Marco [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, 2024.
Description
1 online resource (385 pages)

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Oxford scholarship online. [More in this series]
Summary note
Schopenhauer is most recognizable as 'the philosopher of pessimism,' the author of a system that teaches how art and morality can help human beings navigate life in 'the worst of all possible worlds.' This dominant image of Schopenhauer has cut off an important branch of his tree of philosophy: the metaphysics of nature and its dialogue with the sciences of the time. 'A Convex Mirror' sheds new light on the development of Schopenhauer's philosophy and his ongoing engagement with the natural sciences. Understanding Schopenhauer's metaphysics requires both an insight into his relationship with science and an appreciation of the role of the natural sciences in his philosophical project.
Notes
Also issued in print: 2024.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Target audience
Specialized.
Source of description
Description based on online resource and publisher information; title from PDF title page (viewed on November 20, 2023).
Contents
  • Cover
  • A Convex Mirror
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Introduction
  • 1. The Single Thought
  • 1. Philosophy as a system
  • 2. What is the single thought?
  • 3. The unity and its parts
  • 4. Science and philosophy of nature in the system
  • 5. The Second Book of The World as Will and Representation
  • 6. Philosophy of nature
  • 2. An Early and Abiding Engagement with the Sciences
  • 1. A taste for the sciences
  • 2. The choice of Göttingen
  • 3. Scientific education at Göttingen and Berlin
  • 4. From physiology to philosophy
  • 5. Berlin and the animal magnetism affair
  • 3. Metaphysician and Naturforscher at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century
  • 1. Kielmeyer, Schelling, and Naturphilosophie
  • 2. Will and evolution
  • 3. The Romantic legacy
  • 4. Spiritism and physiology
  • 5. Goethe, master and adversary
  • 6. Colors as specific sensations in the eye
  • 4. Metaphysics of Nature in The World as Will and Representation
  • 1. The will between metaphysics and science
  • 2. Analogy
  • 3. Ideas and forces
  • 4. Stufenfolge, teleology, and temporality
  • 5. Philosophy of nature
  • 5. In Dialogue with Kant and Schelling
  • 1. On Kant's metaphysics of nature
  • 2. The fascination of Schelling's Naturphilosophie
  • 3. Appreciation and criticism of Naturphilosophie
  • 4. Distinguishing science from philosophy
  • 5. The conundrum of the philosophy of nature
  • 6. Toward a philosophy of science
  • 6. A New Season
  • 1. Great hopes, hard times
  • 2. A second edition of The World as Will and Representation?
  • 3. The Supplements and the system
  • 4. The rediscovery of Kant and Schelling's ghost
  • 5. A new status for the sciences: professionalism and disciplines
  • 7. Philosophy of the Sciences.
  • 1. The Vorlesungen and the system
  • 2. Turning points
  • 3. Foliant 37
  • 4. Philosophizing scientists
  • 5. Philosophizing on the sciences
  • 6. Physiology and philosophy
  • 8. On Will in Nature: A Philosophical Work
  • 1. A new appreciation of On Will in Nature
  • 2. Confirmation and the scientists' insight into the will
  • 3. Relinquishing the Ideas
  • 4. Will and causality
  • 5. The crucial role of On Will in Nature
  • 9. Grappling with the Sciences
  • 1. The chemical syllogism
  • 2. A new approach to teleology
  • 3. Creative drives
  • 4. Intellect and brain, representation and reality
  • 5. Matter, forces, and scientific realism
  • 10. Essences, Emergence, and Ground
  • 1. Ideas, or explaining the phenomenal world
  • 2. Ideas and aesthetic experience
  • 3. Ideas as essences
  • 4. Teleology as an emergent property
  • 5. Will and metaphysics
  • 6. Definitions of will
  • 7. Will and metaphysical grounding
  • Concluding Remarks
  • Bibliography
  • Index.
ISBN
  • 0-19-759918-4
  • 0-19-759916-8
OCLC
1404448032
Doi
  • 10.1093/oso/9780197599150.001.0001
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