Eighteenth-century English labouring-class poets. Volume 2 / John Goodridge, Simon Kövesi, David Fairer, Tim Burke, William Christmas.

Author
Goodridge, John, 1953- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
1st.
Published/​Created
London : Routledge, 2019.
Description
1 online resource (495 pages)

Details

Subject(s)
Editor
Author
Summary note
Poets of labouring class origin were published in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some were popular and important in their day but few are available today. This is a collection of some of those poems from the 18th century.
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
Contents
  • Of Volume II
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chronology
  • Note on the Text
  • HENRY JONES (1 721-1770)
  • The Bricklayer's Poem. Presented to his Excellency the Lord Lieutenant. On his Arrival in this Kingdom (1745)
  • The Bricklayer's Poem, to the Countess of chesterfield, on her Ladyship's Saving the Soldiers from Being Shot (1745)
  • Philosophy. A Poem. Address'd to the Ladies Who Attend Mr Booth's Lectures (1746)
  • From Poems on Several Occasions (1749)
  • Advertisement
  • Lines to Lord Chief Justice Singleton
  • On Mr Pope's Death
  • To a Friend Who I-lad Writ Verses to Mr Pope, in the Person of Apollo, Occasioned by Hearing That Poet Abus'd
  • To the Reverend Dr Mann, Occasioned by the Author's Asking Him for a Subject to Write on, and his Saying He Could Think of None
  • On his Excellency the Earl of Chesterfield's Resigning the Government of Ireland
  • From Merit. A Poem: Inscribed to the Right Honourable Philip Earl of Chesterfield (1753)
  • [Introduction; Newton, Locke and Boyle] [Garrick's Genius]
  • From The Relief or, Day Thoughts: A Poem. Occasioned by the Complaint, or Night Thoughts (1754)
  • Introduction; Critique of Young's Style] [Critique of Graveyard School of Poetry}
  • On the Invention of Letters, and the Utility of the Press (1755)
  • From Clifton: A Poem, in Two Cantos, lnthldinR Bristol and A/I its Environs (1767)
  • Canto I
  • JAMES EYRE WEEKES (fl. 1743-53)
  • From Poems on Several Occasions (1743)
  • To his Serene Highness Prince Nobody
  • On a Pen
  • The Poet's Case
  • The Cobler's Poem, to a Certain Noble Peer. Occasioned by the Brick-Layer's Poem (1745)
  • THOMAS BLACKLOCK (1721-1791)
  • MARY LEAPOR (1722-1 746)
  • From Poems upon Several Occasions, Volume 1 (1748)
  • To the Reader
  • An Epistle to a Lady
  • The Head-Ach
  • To Grammaticus
  • On Mr Pope's Universal Prayer
  • Advice to Myrtillo
  • From Poems upon Several Occasions... The Second and Last Volume (1751)
  • To John * * * * *, Esq;
  • An Epistle to Artemesia. On Fame
  • The Epistle of Deborah Dough
  • JAMES MAXWELL. (1720-1800)
  • From Dii7ne Miscellanies, or, Sacred Poems (1756)
  • Mechanical Exercise Applied to Devotion and Piety; or the Weaver's Meditations. Meditation IV Contentment
  • From Animadversions on Some Poets and Poetasters of the Present Ate,
  • Especially, R-t B-s, and]-,, L-k. With a Contrast of Some of the 1-ormerAe (1788)
  • Animadversions &c.
  • On the Ayr-Shire Ploughman Poet, or Poetaster, R. B.
  • On the Prolongation of the Slave Trade. A Moral Essqy, Set Forth in the Following Dialqgue (1790?)
  • From A Brief Narrative; or, Some Remarks on the Life of James Maxwel Poet, in Pais1y. Written by Himself; at the Beginnings of his Entering the Seven fy-Sixtb Year of his Age (1795) Preface
  • A Brief Narrative, &c
  • [Employments; Family Life]
  • [Return to Scotland; Death of his Wife]
  • [Finding an Audience]
  • WILLIAM VERNON (b. 1734)
  • From Poems on Several Occasions (1758)
  • Epistle to a Friend
  • A Journey to Wales
  • The Poet New Cloathed
  • Horace Book 1. Ode XXII
  • Horace Book 11. Ode XIV
  • Iphis and Anaxerete
  • Horace Book IV. Ode IX. Imitated
  • WILLIAIvI FM.CONER (1732-1769)
  • From The Shipwreck (1762)
  • Argument
  • Poem
  • WILLIAM BRIMBLE (ft 1765)
  • From Poems, Attempted on Various Occasions (1765)
  • Preface
  • Addressed to an Afflicted Young Lady and her Female Friend, on their Preparing to Leave Bath
  • A Burial Hymn, Taken out of the 7" Chap. of Job
  • On a Visit to Marshfield
  • A Short Review of a Journey from the Country to Taunton Assizes
  • On Fortitude
  • The Song of Deborah and Barak,Judges 5", Paraphrased
  • On the Commencement of the Late Spanish War
  • JAMES WOODHOUSE (1735-1820)
  • From Poems On Several Occasions (l766)
  • The Author's Apology
  • Advertisement. To the First Edition (1764)
  • An E1eg To William Shenstone, Esq; of the Lessowes
  • Elegy 11. Written to William Shenstone, Esq; of the Lessowes
  • To William Shenstone, Esq; on his Indisposition in the Spring, 1762
  • Benevolence, An Ode. Inscribed to my Friends
  • The Lessowes. A Poem
  • Wrote at the Lessowcs, after Mr Shenstone's Death
  • Palemon and Colinet
  • To the Right Honorable Lord Lyttelton
  • To the Right Honorable Lord Lyttelton. An Epistle
  • Verses. Addressed to
  • Gratitude. A Poem
  • To the Right Honourable the Countess of
  • Ode to Apollo
  • From Poems on Several Occasions (1788)
  • Address
  • From The life and Lucubrations of Crispinus Soiblerus. A Novel, in Verse. Written in the L4st Century: With Annotations and Commentaries, by a Friend (1814)
  • From Chap. I. Introduction
  • [On Enclosure]
  • [The Rights of the Poor]
  • [Growth of the Poet's Mind]
  • CUTHBERT SHAW (1739-1771)
  • From The Race (1766)
  • Address to the Critics The Race
  • [Announcement of the Race]
  • [Reviewers]
  • [Dodsley]
  • [Johnson]
  • [Henry Jones]
  • [Stephen Duck]
  • [Unknown Hopefuls]
  • Monody to the Memory of a Young LadY Who Died in Child-Bed (1768)
  • N. EllioT (ft. 1767-1776)
  • The Vestry, a Poem (1767)
  • From The Atheist. A Poem (1770) [Introduction]
  • [Religion and Reason]
  • [His Poetry]
  • An Ode to Chaiiy (1770)
  • MICHAEL BRUCE (1746-1767)
  • SAMUEL LAW (fl. 1772)
  • From A Domestic Winter-Piece: Or, a Poem, bxhibiIing a Full View of the A uthor Dwelling Place in the Winter-Season (1772) The Preface
  • [Introduction]
  • [Description of a Storm]
  • JOHN BENNET fl 1774-1796)
  • From Poems on Several Occasions (1774)
  • To my Honourable Benefactors and Worthy Subscribers To the Rev Mr Warton, Curate of Woodstock, and Late Professor of Poetry in Oxford
  • To the Author, on his Book of Poems
  • Woodstock
  • The Manor Ruins
  • Sunday
  • Industry and Sloth. A Dialogue
  • To Mr T. D.
  • The Crafts in Distress
  • Sent to his Grace the D- of -, on Receiving a Bounty for his Poems
  • Bowley's Ale
  • The Tail
  • Prologue to Cato
  • Crispin. By Mr J. G.
  • THOMAS OLIVlRS (1725-1799)
  • A Hymn to the God of Abraham, In Three Parts (1775)
  • CHRiSTOPHER JONFS (fl. 1775-1782)
  • Sowton. A Village Conference: Occasioned by a Late Law Decision (1775)
  • Sowton &c
  • From The Miscellaneous Poetic Attempts of C. Jones, an Uneducated
  • Journeyman Wool. Comber (1782)
  • On a Book of Poems
  • Ode to Benevolence
  • The Invitation
  • Occasioned by a Dispute Respecting the Origins of War, Source of Happiness, &c
  • On Manning his Majesty's Fleet by the Irregular Mode of Pressing Indiscriminately
  • To the Hon. Members of the Committee for 'Ways and Means, 1779
  • Ode: Addressed to the Rev Mr Tasker, on Reading the Third Edition of his Popular Pindaric Ode, to the War-Like Genius of Great Britain
  • To an Injudicious Critic, Who Assumed the Name of Cato Censor
  • The Empty Jug
  • On Plotting
  • The Royal Oak: A Song
  • JOHN LUCAS (ft. 1776-1781)
  • From Miscellanies in Verse and Prose (1776)
  • A Dialogue, by Way of Apology
  • Philo's Garden, or, a Description of the Garden of the Soul. An Allegory
  • The Author to his Muse
  • Address to a Friend
  • The Cobler
  • From The Fall of Pharoab; And Philo's Apology. Two Poems (1781)
  • Philo's Apology: Or, the Cobler, and his Muse
  • THOMAS CHATERTON (1752-1770)
  • From Poems Supposed to Have Been Written at Bristol, by Thomas
  • Rowley, and Others, in the Fifteenth Century (1777)
  • An Excelente Balade of Charitie
  • The Stone of Wiliiam Canynge
  • ANNE WILSON (fl. 1778-1783)
  • From Teisa: A Descriptive Poem of the River Teese, its Towns and Antiquities (1778)
  • [Introduction: Source of the Tees]
  • [Mining Pastoral]
  • [Cheesemaking and Herb Gathering]
  • [Her Life]
  • [Barnard Weavers]
  • [Valediction; Pageant of Tributaries; Death of Chatham]
  • SUSANNAH HARRISON (1752-1784) From Songs in the Night (1780)
  • The Recommendation
  • LXXXIII. Longing for Public Worship
  • XC. Longing to Be Dissolved
  • XCII. 'How are my Powers all tun'd to mourn'
  • CXI. Renouncing the World
  • CXIX. To Young Women
  • Meditations in Blank Verse
  • VI. A Short Dialogue between Myself and my Soul
  • Notes
  • Thematic index
  • Index of First Lines
  • Index of Titles.
ISBN
  • 1-000-74814-6
  • 1-000-74176-1
  • 0-429-35018-X
OCLC
1173770593
Doi
  • 10.4324/9780429350184
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