The civilizing process and the past we now abhor : slavery, cat-burning and the colonialism of time / Bruce Fleming.

Author
Fleming, Bruce E. (Bruce Edward), 1954- [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
  • Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2022.
  • ©2022
Description
vi, 141 pages ; 23 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
  • Classical and contemporary social theory [More in this series]
  • Classical and Contemporary Social Theory
Summary note
"Drawing on the thought of Norbert Elias and using as a thread a purposely apolitical example of cruelty to animals to focus on changes in attitudes, this book explores the ways in which we deal with a past that we now abhor. As we struggle to deal with the fact that our past shapes us - indeed is us, but is not us - and cannot be changed, the modern tendency is to demand merely cosmetic rather than real changes to the world and to judge harshly the individuals with whom the past is populated, pulling down statues or re-naming institutions. An examination of our modern colonialism of time rather than place, which refuses to consider or accept the fact that without our past, we wouldn't be here at all, let alone in a position to judge, The Civilizing Process and the Past We Now Abhor will appeal to scholars and students of sociology, cultural studies and literature with interests in contemporary questions of race, morality and efforts to correct the wrongs of our past"-- Provided by publisher.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
Bad manners -- Woody -- Past produces present -- Slavery -- Explanations -- Rituals -- The modern age -- Democracy -- Durkheim -- Groupthink -- The polyglot West -- Changes -- People and pets -- Reparations -- Forty years in the wilderness.
ISBN
  • 9781032127378 (hardcover)
  • 1032127376 (hardcover)
  • 9781032134703 (paperback)
  • 1032134704 (paperback)
LCCN
2021050795
OCLC
1277276103
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