Sustainable design of pipelines : guidelines for achieving advanced functionality / edited by Walt Schwarz, P.E., Patrick J. White, P.E., Mark S. Mihm, P.E. ; prepared by the Task Committee on the Sustainable Design of Pipelines ; sponsored by the Pipelines Division of the Utility Engineering and Surveying Institute.

Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
1st ed.
Published/​Created
  • Reston, VA : American Society of Civil Engineers, 2022.
  • ©2022.
Description
1 online resource (xiv, 194 pages) : illustrations (many color)

Details

Subject(s)
Series
  • ASCE manuals and reports on engineering practice; 151 [More in this series]
  • Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practice
Summary note
MOP 151 details the sustainable design and construction of pipelines and presents methods, practices, and decisions that influence and guide sustainable planning, design, construction, and operation, including the Envision infrastructure sustainability rating system.
Source of description
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Contents
  • Intro
  • Book_5129_C000
  • Half Title
  • Title Page
  • Copyright Page
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Book_5129_C001
  • Chapter 1 : Introduction and Background
  • 1.1   Background
  • 1.2   Manual of Practice Organization
  • 1.3   Concept of Sustainability
  • 1.4   Sustainability and Practice
  • 1.5   Manual of Practice General Objectives
  • References
  • Book_5129_C002
  • Chapter 2 : Pipeline Products
  • 2.1   Scope Limitations and Purpose
  • 2.2   Product Sustainability Assessment
  • 2.2.1   Performance
  • 2.2.2   Environmental
  • 2.2.3   Economic (Including Energy)
  • 2.2.4   Life Expectancy (Durability)
  • 2.2.5   Maintainability and Resiliency
  • 2.3   Installation
  • 2.4   End of Life
  • 2.5   Summary
  • Book_5129_C003
  • Chapter 3 : Owner Best Practices
  • 3.1   Introduction
  • 3.2   Project Definition and Scoping
  • 3.3   Community/Social Sustainability Leadership
  • 3.4   Project Leadership Management
  • 3.5   Long-Term Planning
  • 3.6   Procurement Management
  • 3.7   Design/Construction Leadership
  • 3.8   Conclusions
  • Book_5129_C004
  • Chapter 4 : Planning and Design Best Practices
  • 4.1   Introduction
  • 4.2   Planning Considerations
  • 4.3   Project Influencers
  • 4.4   Owner Goals
  • 4.4.1   Owner Leadership
  • 4.4.2   Community and Social Considerations
  • 4.4.3   Engineering Design
  • 4.4.4   Trenchless Technology and Engineering Design
  • 4.4.5   Construction with Trenchless Technology
  • 4.4.6   Bedding and Backfill
  • 4.5   Higher Levels of Sustainable Achievement
  • 4.5.1   Nonstationarity
  • 4.5.2   Resilience
  • 4.6   Conclusion
  • Book_5129_C005
  • Chapter 5 : Sustainable Construction
  • 5.1   Introduction
  • 5.2   Designer-Influenced Practices
  • 5.2.1   Embedment and Backfill
  • 5.2.2   Inspection and Testing
  • 5.2.3   Restoration Requirements.
  • 5.2.4   Incorporate Appurtenances to Facilitate Maintenance and Repair
  • 5.2.5   Installation Methods
  • 5.2.6   Information Management/Document Control
  • 5.2.7   Contracting/Procurement Methods
  • 5.3   Contractor-Influenced Practices
  • 5.3.1   Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions during Construction
  • 5.3.2   Reducing Fuel Consumption
  • 5.3.3   Reducing Idling Time
  • 5.3.4   Equipment Maintenance
  • 5.3.5   Properly Sized Equipment
  • 5.3.6   Material Selection, Procurement, and Shipping Methods
  • 5.3.7   Recycling and Reuse of Construction Materials
  • 5.3.8   Use of Local Resources
  • 5.3.9   Reducing Social Impacts
  • 5.4   Sustainable Construction Methods
  • 5.4.1   Trenchless Technology Benefits
  • 5.4.2   Two Main Divisions of Trenchless Technology Methods
  • 5.4.2.1   Trenchless Construction Methods.   TCMs for new installation of pipelines and conduits include all methods of installing new utility systems below grade without direct installation into an open-cut trench. TCMs are divided into two broad categ
  • 5.4.2.2   Horizontal Auger Boring Methods.   The horizontal auger boring (HAB) is a cost-effective method of installing a steel casing pipe crossing a road, highway, or railroad track. This process simultaneously jacks a steel casing from a drive pit t
  • 5.4.2.3   Microtunnel Boring Machines.   Microtunneling boring machines (MTBMs) are mainly used for the installation of a gravity pipeline such as a sanitary or storm sewer. MTBMs are laser-guided and remotely controlled and permit an accurate monitori
  • 5.4.2.4   Horizontal Directional Drilling Methods.   Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) methods are mainly used for the installation of pressure pipelines and cable conduits. These methods involve steerable systems for the installation of both small.
  • 5.4.2.5   Pipe Ramming Methods.   Pipe ramming methods are mainly used for the installation of utilities for road and railroad crossings. Using an air compressor, this process hammers a steel casing pipe inside the earth from a drive pit. The pipe migh
  • 5.4.3   Trenchless Renewal Methods
  • 5.4.3.1   Cured-In-Place Pipe.   The CIPP process involves the insertion of a resin-impregnated fabric tube into an existing pipe by the use of water or air inversion or winching. Usually, the fabric is polyester felt material, fiberglass reinforced, or
  • 5.4.3.2   Underground Coatings and Linings.   The spraying of a thin mortar lining or a resin coating onto pipes is another method of pipeline renewal. For nonworker-entry pipes (usually for host pipes less than 48 in. diameter), coatings and linings
  • 5.4.3.3   Sliplining.   Sliplining is mainly used for structural applications when old pipes do not have joint settlements or misalignments. In this method, a new pipeline of smaller diameter is inserted into the old pipeline and usually the annulus s
  • 5.4.3.4   Modified Sliplining.   The MSL includes methods in which pipe sections or plastic strips are installed in close-fit with the existing pipe and the annular space is grouted. There are three variations of the MSL method: panel lining (PL), spi
  • 5.4.3.5   In-Line Replacement.   When the capacity of pipelines is found to be inadequate, then ILR should be considered. There are two categories representing ILR: pipe bursting and pipe removal (also called pipe eating). Pipe bursting, as the name i
  • 5.4.3.6   Close-Fit Pipe.   This type of trenchless pipeline renewal temporarily reduces the cross-sectional area of the new pipe before it is installed, then expands it to its original size and shape after placement to provide a close fit with the ex.
  • 5.4.3.7   Localized Repairs or Point-Source Repair.   When local defects are found in a structurally sound pipeline, localized or point-source repairs are considered. Systems are available for remote-controlled resin injection to seal localized defect
  • 5.4.3.8   Lateral Renewal.   Sewer service laterals can be renewed using any of the methods used for renewal of main lines such as chemical grouting, CIPP, CFP, pipe bursting, and spray-on lining. Table 5-10 presents the main characteristics of LR me
  • 5.4.3.9   Sewer Manhole Renewal.   Sewer manhole renewal methods are provided to prevent surface water inflow and groundwater infiltration, repair structural damage, and protect surfaces from damage from corrosive substances. However, when renewal met
  • 5.5   Summary
  • Book_5129_C006
  • Chapter 6 : Best Practices-Operation and Maintenance
  • 6.1   Introduction
  • 6.2   Testing
  • 6.3   Maintenance
  • 6.4   General Maintenance Activities
  • 6.5   Rehabilitation
  • 6.6   Monitoring
  • 6.7   Asset Management
  • 6.8   Data Collection
  • 6.9   Condition Assessment Methods
  • 6.10   Pipeline Inspections
  • 6.11   Determining Cathodic Protection Performance
  • 6.11.1   Sacrificial Anode
  • 6.11.2   Impressed Current
  • 6.12   System Optimization
  • 6.12.1   Reducing Energy Usage
  • 6.12.2   Reduce Peak Demands by Utilizing Storage
  • 6.12.3   Reduce Energy Peaks
  • 6.13   Reduce Third-Party Damage
  • 6.14   Reduce Outages and Catastrophic Failures
  • 6.15   Summary
  • Book_5129_C007
  • Chapter 7 : Life-Cycle Inventory/Life-Cycle Analysis: Achieving Sustainable Functionality in Pipeline Design and Manufacturing
  • 7.1   Introduction
  • 7.2   Standard History and Methodology
  • 7.3   Cradle to Grave
  • 7.4   Water/Wastewater Infrastructure
  • 7.4.1   Production Constraints
  • 7.4.2   Installation Constraints
  • 7.4.3   Use Constraints.
  • 7.4.4   Recovery/Disposal Constraints
  • 7.5   Social and Environmental Costs
  • 7.6   Pipe Diameter
  • 7.7   Owner Costs
  • 7.7.1   Preconstruction Costs
  • 7.7.2   Construction Costs
  • 7.7.3   Postconstruction Costs
  • 7.8   Environmental Costs-The Envision Rating System
  • 7.9   Social Costs
  • 7.10   Life-Cycle Cost Analysis
  • 7.11   Reducing Social Costs
  • 7.12   Conclusions
  • Book_5129_C008
  • Chapter 8 : Envision Project Rating System
  • 8.1   Background and Development
  • 8.2   Rating System Purpose and Goals
  • 8.3   Organization and Structure
  • 8.3.1   Tools
  • 8.3.2   Phases
  • 8.3.3   Categories and Subcategories
  • 8.3.4   Credits
  • 8.3.5   Levels of Achievement
  • 8.3.6   Evaluation Criteria
  • 8.4   Project Scoring and Guidance
  • 8.4.1   Guidance Manual
  • 8.4.2   Categories and Credits
  • 8.4.3   Quality of Life
  • 8.4.4   Leadership
  • 8.4.5   Resource Allocation
  • 8.4.6   Natural World
  • 8.4.7   Climate and Risk
  • 8.5   Envision Implementation
  • 8.5.1   Roles
  • 8.5.2   Project Application and Verification Process
  • 8.5.3   Fee Schedule
  • 8.5.4   Recognition and Awards
  • 8.6   Applicable Features for Pipeline Design and Construction
  • 8.7   Summary
  • Reference
  • Book_5129_A001
  • Appendix A : Pipe Standards, Design Manuals, and Guidelines
  • A.1   Relevant Standard Development Organizations
  • A.2   Concrete Pipe
  • A.3   Ductile Iron Pipe
  • A.4   Fiber-Reinforced Thermosetting Resin Pipe
  • A.5   Polyethylene Pipe
  • A.6   Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Pipe
  • A.7   Steel Pipe
  • A.8   Vitrified Clay Pipe
  • Book_5129_A002
  • Appendix B : Pipe Materials Resource Information
  • B.1   Polyvinyl Chloride Pipe
  • B.1.1   Primary Raw Materials in Polyvinyl Chloride Pipes
  • B.1.2   Clean and Safe Manufacturing of Polyvinyl Chloride Pipes
  • B.1.3   Minimal Waste Discharge and Recyclability
  • B.1.4   Suitability of Polyvinyl Chloride Pipes Left in Place.
ISBN
  • 1-5231-4472-6
  • 0-7844-8386-8
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view

Supplementary Information