Auld Lang Syne : A Song and Its Culture.

Author
Grant, M. J. [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
  • Open Book Publishers 2021
  • Cambridge : Open Book Publishers, 2021.
  • ©2021.
Description
1 online resource (360 pages)

Details

Summary note
In Auld Lang Syne: A Song and its Culture, M. J. Grant explores the history of this iconic song, demonstrating how its association with ideas of fellowship, friendship and sociality has enabled it to become so significant for such a wide range of individuals and communities around the world.
Source of description
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Language note
English
Contents
  • Intro
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Note on the Text
  • Acknowledgements
  • 1. Elements of a Theory of Song
  • 1.1 The Social Functions of Song
  • 1.2 The Songs Folk Sing: Some Historical Evidence
  • 1.3 Implied and Inherited Significance
  • 1.4 Auld Lang Syne as an Object of Research: Some Issues
  • The Tunes
  • The Words
  • The Traditions
  • 2. Auld Lang Syne: Context and Genesis
  • 2.1 Being a Short Discourse on Song in the Eighteenth Century
  • 2.2 Auld Lang Syne before Burns
  • FIRST PART
  • SECOND PART
  • 2.3 The Jacobite Songs
  • 3. Burns's Song
  • 3.1 Mrs Dunlop's Song
  • 3.2 Burns's Text
  • 3.3 Burns's Tune
  • 3.4 What Thomson Did
  • 3.5 From M1 to M2
  • 3.6 The Legacy of the Old Songs and Two Contemporaries of the New
  • 4. Auld Lang Syne in the Early Nineteenth Century
  • 4.1 "We'll toom the cup to friendship's growth"
  • 4.2 The Establishment of M2
  • 4.3 Performance and Periodicals
  • 4.4 Mr Sinclair's Song
  • 4.5 After Rob Roy Macgregor
  • 4.6 American Sources
  • 5. The Song of Union
  • 5.1 The Freemasons
  • 5.2 The Fraternalist's Song
  • 5.3 Immortal Memory: The Burns Clubs and the Burns Cult
  • 5.4 Solidarity
  • 6. The Song of Parting
  • 6.1 Good Night, And Joy Be With You All
  • 6.2 The Song of Empire
  • 6.3 The Song of Parting
  • 7. The Folk's Song
  • 7.1 Mr Micawber's Song
  • 7.2 The Song of Conflict and Reconciliation
  • 7.3 Variations on a Theme
  • 7.4 Iconography and Reminiscence
  • 7.5 The Sentimentalist's Song
  • 7.6 Auld Lang Syne at the Threshold of the Information Revolution
  • 8.The Song of New Year
  • 8.1 A Guid New Year To Ane And A': The Scots and New Year
  • 8.2 New Year at St. Paul's
  • 8.3 America and the Bells
  • 8.4 Traditions Come Together
  • 9. Take Leave, Brothers: The German Reception of Auld Lang Syne
  • 9.1 The Art Composer's Song
  • 9.2 Active and Passive Reception
  • 9.3 The Scout's Song.
  • 9.4 Closing the Circle
  • 10. A Song Abroad
  • 10.1 Princess Constance Magogo's Song
  • 10.2 Foreign-Language Versions of Auld Lang Syne
  • 10.3 Bells and Anthems
  • 10.4 Quotation and Quodlibet
  • 10.5 The Song of War and Peace
  • 10.6 Threads Lead Back to the Centre
  • 11. Preliminary Conclusions: A Song and Its Culture
  • 12. Auld Acquaintance: Auld Lang Syne Comes Home
  • 12.1 The Road to Devolution
  • 12.2 The Return of M1 and the Rise of M3
  • 12.3 What Does Auld Lang Syne Have to Do with Burns?
  • Appendix 1: Eight Jacobite Songs Related to Auld Lang Syne
  • 1. "The true Scots Mens Lament for the Loss of the Rights of their Ancient Kingdom", published by John Read of Pearson's Close Edinburgh, 1718.
  • 2. "A SONG To the tune of AULD LANG SYNE"
  • 3. "A ballad for those whose honour is sound, Who cannot be named, and must not be found. Written by a Sculpter in the Year 1746"
  • 4. Jacobite "Auld Lang Syne" attributed to Lochiel's Regiment (Le Régiment d'Albanie), 1747
  • 5. "Ballad. Tune Auld Lang Syne"
  • 6.  "Song. To the same Tune" [i.e., Auld Lang Syne]
  • 7. "Shall Monarchy Be Quite Forgot"
  • 8. Jacobite "Auld Lang Syne", by Andrew Lang (1844-1912)
  • Appendix 2: Burns's Auld Lang Syne-The Five Versions (B1-B5)
  • B1 The version sent to Frances Dunlop, 7 December 1788
  • B2 The version published in The Scots Musical Museum, 1796
  • B3 A version written by Burns into a copy of vol. I of the Scots Musical Museum
  • B4 The version sent to George Thomson, September 1793
  • B5 What may have been a "working version", now held in the Burns Cottage Museum in Alloway
  • Appendix 3: Seven Parodies and Contrafacta from The Universal Songster, vols. II-III (1829, 1834)
  • 1. "I'll drive dull sorrow from my mind"
  • 2. "'Tis true this life's a languid stream"
  • 3. "Winny won't be mine"
  • 4. "Should brandy ever be forgot? A parody".
  • 5. "Auld lang syne" (J. H. Dixon)
  • 6. "Should lovers' joys be e'er forgot?"
  • 7. "War was proclaimed 'twixt love and I"
  • Appendix 4: Eight Nineteenth-Century German Translations
  • 1. "Die alte gute Zeit" (Wilhelm Gerhard)
  • 2. "Soll alte Freundschaft vergessen sein" (Eduard Fiedler)
  • 3. "Die alte Zeit" (Heinrich Julius Heintze)
  • 4. "'S ist lange her" (L. G. Silbergleit)
  • 5. "Die liebe, alte Zeit" (Otto Baisch)
  • 6. "Lang, lang dohin" (Gustav Legerlotz)
  • 7. "Die gute alte Zeit" (Wilhelmine Prinzhorn)
  • 8. Auf gute alte Zeit (K. Bartsch)
  • Appendix 5: Four Versions in Jèrriais
  • 1. Version by Ph'lippe Langliais (died 1884)
  • 2. Version by John D. Hubert (1895)
  • 3. Version published in Nouvelle Chronique de Jersey, 15 November 1902
  • 4. Version by Mathilde dé Faye, "Georgie"
  • Bibliography
  • Bibliography I: Main Burns Editions Cited
  • Bibliography II: Musical and Poetical Sources without Author/Editor Names
  • Bibliography III: Other Sources Referenced Using the Author-Date System
  • Discography for Recordings Discussed in Chapter 12
  • List of Illustrations
  • Audio Examples
  • Index.
ISBN
1-80064-067-6
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