Kurt Weill's America / Naomi Graber.

Author
Graber, Naomi [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
  • New York, New York State : Oxford University Press, [2021]
  • ©2021
Description
1 online resource (328 pages) : illustrations (black and white).

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Oxford scholarship online. [More in this series]
Summary note
Throughout his life, German-Jewish composer Kurt Weill was fascinated by the idea of America. His European works depict America as a Capitalist dystopia. But in 1935, it became clear that Europe was no longer safe for Weill, and he set sail for New World, and his engagement with American culture shifted. From that point forward, most of his works concerned the idea of 'America,' whether celebrating her successes, or critiquing her shortcomings. As an outsider-turned-insider, Weill's insights into American culture were unique. He was keenly attuned to the difficult relationship America had with her immigrants, but was slower to grasp the subtleties of others, particularly those surrounding race relations, even though his works reveal that he was devoted to the idea of racial equality.
Notes
Also issued in print: 2021.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Target audience
Specialized.
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
Contents
  • Cover
  • Half-Title
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • Introduction
  • 1 .Weill's America, America's Weill
  • 2 .Shifting Paradigms: Experiments in German and U.S. Alchemy
  • 3 .For the People: Folk Music
  • 4 .Living History: American History and World War.II
  • 5 .Alienation and Integration: Gender and Sexuality
  • 6 .Israel in Egypt: Race and Ethnicity
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Permissions
  • Index.
ISBN
  • 0-19-090660-X
  • 0-19-090661-8
  • 0-19-090659-6
OCLC
1198990414
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