Identities, ethnicities and gender in antiquity / edited by Jacqueline Fabre-Serris, Alison Keith and Florence Klein.

Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Berlin ; Boston : Walter de Gruyter Gmbh, [2021]
Description
vi, 286 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Editor
Series
Summary note
The question of 'identity' arises for any individual or ethnic group when they come into contact with a stranger or another people. Such contact results in the self-conscious identification of ways of life, customs, traditions, and other forms of society as one's own specific cultural features and the construction of others as characteristic of peoples from more or less distant lands, described as very 'different'. Since all societies are structured by the division between the sexes in every field of public and private activity, the modern concept of 'gender' is a key comparator to be considered when investigating how the concepts of identity and ethnicity are articulated in the evaluation of the norms and values of other cultures. The object of this book is to analyze, at the beginning Western culture, various examples of the ways the Greeks and Romans deployed these three parameters in the definition of their identity, both cultural and gendered, by reference to their neighbours and foreign nations at different times in their history. This study also aims to enrich contemporary debates by showing that we have yet to learn from the ancients' discussions of social and cultural issues that are still relevant today.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
ISBN
  • 9783110719857 (hardcover)
  • 3110719851 (hardcover)
LCCN
2021931445
OCLC
1199327999
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view

Supplementary Information