Credit Cycles, Fiscal Policy, and Global Imbalances / Callum Jones.

Author
Jones, Callum [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Washington, D.C. : International Monetary Fund, 2021.
Description
1 online resource (53 pages)

Details

Author
Series
Summary note
We study the role that changes in credit and fiscal positions play in explaining current account fluctuations. Empirically, the current account declines when credit increases, and when the fiscal balance declines. We use a two-country model with financial frictions and fiscal policy to study these facts. We estimate the model using annual data for the U.S. and "a rest of the world" aggregate that includes main advanced economies. We find that about 30 percent of U.S. current account balance fluctuations are due to domestic credit shocks, while fiscal shocks explain about 14 percent. We evaluate simple macroprudential policy rules and show that they help reduce global imbalances. By taming the financial cycle, macroprudential rules that react to domestic credit conditions or to domestic house prices would have led to a smaller and less volatile U.S. current account deficit. We also show that a countercylical fiscal policy rule that stabilizes output growth reduces the level and volatility of the U.S. current account deficit.
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
ISBN
1513570013 :
Doi
  • 10.5089/9781513570013.001
Statement on language in description
Princeton University Library aims to describe library materials in a manner that is respectful to the individuals and communities who create, use, and are represented in the collections we manage. Read more...
Other views
Staff view

Supplementary Information