Public Choice Analyses of American Economic History [electronic resource] : Volume 2 / edited by Joshua Hall, Marcus Witcher.

Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
1st ed. 2018.
Published/​Created
Cham : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Springer, 2018.
Description
1 online resource (185 pages).

Details

Subject(s)
Editor
Series
Summary note
This book - the second of two volumes- looks at episodes in American economic history from a public choice perspective. Each chapter discusses citizens, special interests, and government officials responding to economic incentives in both markets and politics. In doing so, the book provides fresh insights into important periods of American history, from the First Nationalist Movement of 1783 to the perpetual renewal of the Federal Reserve in 1927. This volume features the work of prominent economic historians such as Hugh Rockoff; well-known public choice scholars such as Joshua Hall and J.R. Clark; and younger scholars such as Marcus Witcher and Zachary Gocenour. This book will be useful for researchers and students interested in economics, history, political science, economic history, public choice, and political economy.
Contents
  • Chapter 1: An Economic Analysis of the First Nationalist Movement of 1783
  • Chapter 2: The Political Economy of the Arbitration Act of 1888
  • Chapter 3: After Johnny Came Marching Home: The Political Economy of Veterans' Benefits in the 19th Century
  • Chapter 4:Partisanship and Electoral Reform: Change in Congressional Cohesion, 1877-1932
  • Chapter 5: The Political Economy of Bank Entry Restrictions
  • Chapter 6: The Political Economy of the Chinese Exclusion Act
  • Chapter 7: Immigrant Ethnic Composition and the Adoption of Women's Suffrage in the United States
  • Chapter 8: The Economics and Politics of the Unit Banking: Evidence from the McFadden Banking Bill of 1927.
ISBN
3-319-95819-4
Doi
  • 10.1007/978-3-319-95819-4
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