The Poetics of Ruins in Renaissance Literature / Andrew Hui.

Author
Hui, Andrew [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
First edition.
Published/​Created
  • New York, NY : Fordham University Press, [2017]
  • ©2017
Description
1 online resource (229 pages) : illustrations (some color).

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Summary note
The Renaissance was the Ruin-naissance, the birth of the ruin as a distinct category of cultural discourse, one that inspired voluminous poetic production. For humanists, the ruin became the material sign that marked the rupture between themselves and classical antiquity. In the first full-length book to document this cultural phenomenon, Andrew Hui explains how the invention of the ruin propelled poets into creating works that were self-aware of their absorption of the past as well as their own survival in the future.
Notes
Includes index.
Source of description
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 23. Jul 2020)
Language note
In English.
Contents
  • Front matter
  • Contents
  • Figures and Color Plates
  • Introduction. A Japanese Friend
  • Chapter 1. The Rebirth of Poetics
  • Chapter 2. The Rebirth of Ruins
  • Chapter 3. Petrarch’s Vestigia and the Presence of Absence
  • Chapter 4. The Hypnerotomachia Poliphili and the Erotics of Fragments
  • Chapter 5. Du Bellay’s Cendre and the Formless Signifier
  • Chapter 6. Spenser’s Moniment and the Allegory of Ruins
  • Epilogue. Fallen Castles and Summer Grass
  • Acknowledgments
  • Notes
  • Index
ISBN
  • 0-8232-7337-7
  • 0-8232-7336-9
OCLC
  • 965766383
  • 959274279
Doi
  • 10.1515/9780823273379
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