Mechanics of earthquake faulting / edited by A. Bizzarri, S. Das and A. Petri.

Author
Bizzarri, A. [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
1st ed.
Published/​Created
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands ; Washington, District of Columbia : IOS Press, [2019]
  • ©2019
Description
1 online resource (249 pages).

Details

Subject(s)
Editor
Series
  • International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi." Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" ; Course 202. [More in this series]
  • Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" ; Course 202
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
Contents
  • Intro
  • Title Page
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • Course group shot
  • The mechanics of supershear earthquake ruptures
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Physical problem
  • 3. Numerical solutions
  • 4. Frequency content
  • 5. The penetration of the forbidden zone
  • 6. The shear-Mach and the Rayleigh-Mach cones
  • 7. The two transition styles: the direct transition and the mother-daughter mechanism
  • 8. Different ground motions
  • 9. Concluding remarks
  • Unusual large earthquakes on oceanic transform faults
  • 2. Pre-existing zones of weakness on the ocean floor
  • 3. Re-activation of old transform faults: earthquakes with conjugate faulting in oceanic environments
  • 3.1. The 1989 great Macquarie Ridge earthquake reactivated a dormant conjugate fault
  • 3.2. The 1987-1992 and the January 23, 2018 Gulf of Alaska earthquake sequences
  • 3.3. The Mw7.8 18 June 2000 Wharton Basin earthquake: simultaneous rupture of conjugate faults in an oceanic setting
  • 3.4. The January 11 and 12, 2012 twin Sumatra earthquake (Mw8.6,8.2)
  • 4. A great earthquake on a fossil fracture zone: the 2004 Tasman Sea earthquake
  • 4.1. Slip below the Moho during earthquakes
  • 5. A great earthquake with the main fault plane normal to regional transform faults: the 1998 Mw8.1 Antarctic plate earthquake
  • 6. Conclusions
  • The evolution of fault slip rate prior to earthquake: The role of slow- and fast-slip modes
  • 1. Wide spectrum of slip rate from fast- to slow-slip
  • 1.1. Various types of slow earthquakes
  • 1.2. Complexity of slow earthquakes
  • 1.3. The early acceleration phase of slow-slip event
  • 2. Episodic unlocking of fault prior to large earthquake
  • 2.1. Foreshock sequence of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan earthquake
  • 2.2. Foreshock sequence of the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique, Chile earthquake.
  • 2.3. Triggering of the 2014 Mw 7.3 Papanoa, Mexico earthquake by a slow-slip event
  • 2.4. Foreshock sequence of the 2016 Mw 7.0 Kumamoto, Japan earthquake
  • 3. Discussion
  • 4. Conclusions
  • The spectrum of fault slip modes from elastodynamic rupture to slow earthquakes
  • 2. Mechanics of slow slip
  • 2.1. Friction laws for slow slip
  • 2.2. Laboratory observations of the full spectrum of slip modes from fast to slow
  • 2.3. Mechanics of laboratory slow earthquakes
  • 3. Earthquake scaling laws for dynamic rupture and slow slip
  • From foreshocks to mainshocks: mechanisms and implications for earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation
  • 2. Foreshocks and mainshocks
  • 2.1. 1934 and 1966 Parkfield, California, USA
  • 2.2. 1992 Joshua Tree, California, USA
  • 2.3. 1999 Izmit, Turkey
  • 2.4. 1999 Hector Mine, California, USA
  • 3. Mainshock initial rupture process
  • 3.1. 1989 Loma Prieta, California, USA
  • 3.2. 2004 Parkfield, California, USA
  • 4. Near source observations at SAFOD
  • 5. Discussion
  • Experimental statistics and stochastic modeling of stick-slip dynamics in a sheared granular fault
  • 1. Motivations
  • 1.1. Crackling noise
  • 1.2. The point of view of the statistical physics
  • 1.3. Critical phenomena
  • 1.4. Universality
  • 2. Sheared granular matter in laboratory experiments
  • 2.1. The laboratory set up
  • 2.2. Distribution of dynamical quantities
  • 3. A stochastic model for the slider motion
  • 3.1. The friction force
  • 3.2. Results from the model
  • 4. Criticality and its possible breakdown
  • 4.1. Where does criticality come from?
  • 4.2. The ABBM model
  • 4.3. Breakdown of criticality
  • 5. Summary and perspectives
  • Inversion of earthquake rupture process: Theory and applications
  • 2. Theory and methods.
  • 2.1. Seismic inversion
  • 2.1.1. Inversion with fixed rake
  • 2.1.2. Inversion with rake variation
  • 2.1.3. Limitations and constraints
  • 2.1.4. Equations for the three kinds of inversions
  • 2.1.5. An example: The 2009 Mw6.3 L'Aquila, Italy, earthquake
  • 2.2. Joint inversion of seismic and geodetic data
  • 3. Applications
  • 3.1. The Mw7.8 Kunlun Mountain Pass earthquake of 14 November 2001
  • 3.1.1. Tectonic settings
  • 3.1.2. Aftershocks
  • 3.1.3. Focal mechanism
  • 3.1.4. Distribution of static slip
  • 3.1.5. Source rupture process
  • 3.1.6. Surface ruptures
  • 3.2. The Mw7.9 Wenchuan, Sichuan, earthquake of 12 May 2008
  • 3.2.1. Tectonic setting
  • 3.2.2. Focal mechanism and aftershocks
  • 3.2.3. Distribution of static slip
  • 3.2.4. Source rupture process
  • 3.3. The Mw6.9 Yushu, Qinghai, earthquake of 14 April 2010
  • 3.3.1. Tectonic setting
  • 3.3.2. Focal mechanism
  • 3.3.3. Distribution of static slip
  • 3.3.4. Source rupture process
  • 3.4. Applications to the earthquake emergency response
  • 4. Summary
  • Do plates begin to slip before some large earthquakes?
  • 2. Izmit earthquake
  • 3. Interplate and intraplate earthquakes
  • Dynamics and spectral properties of subduction earth-quakes
  • 2. Observations
  • 3. Theory
  • 3.1. Near field from a point source in an infinite medium
  • 3.2. A simplified model
  • 4. The 1 April 2014 Iquique earthquake
  • 5. The 24 April 2017 Valparaiso earthquake
  • 5.1. Observations of the Valparaiso earthquake
  • 6. Discussion
  • 7. Conclusions
  • Earthquake occurrence, recurrence, and hazard
  • 2. Earthquake phenomenology: the state of the art
  • 3. Earthquakes according to PSHA
  • Assumption 0. A probabilistic model of earthquake occurrence can be derived
  • Assumption 1. Seismicity is known
  • Assumption 2. Seismicity is time independent.
  • Assumption 3. Tectonic strain is released by large earthquakes
  • Assumption 4. Strain energy is released by Characteristic Earthquakes
  • Assumption 5. The impossible assumption: Characteristic Earthquakes occurring at random
  • Assumption 6. Exceedance probability and Return Time
  • Assumption 7. The sum of ignorance leads to knowledge: the cognitive democracy of logic trees
  • 4. Discussion
  • 5. Conclusions
  • List of participants.
ISBN
1-61499-979-1
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