Race, citizenship, and law in American literature / by Gregg D. Crane. [electronic resource]

Author
Crane, Gregg D. (Gregg David) [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
1st ed.
Published/​Created
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Description
1 online resource (xi, 299 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Cambridge studies in American literature and culture ; 128. [More in this series]
Summary note
In this broad ranging and powerful study, Gregg Crane examines the interaction between civic identity, race and justice in American law and literature. Crane recounts the efforts of literary and legal figures to bring the nation's law into line with the moral consensus that slavery and racial oppression were evil. By documenting an actual historical interaction central both to American literature and American constitutional law, Crane reveals the influence of literature on the constitutional discourse of citizenship. Covering such writers as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Frederick Douglass, and a whole range of novelists, poets, philosophers, politicians, lawyers and judges, this is a remarkable book, that will revise the relationship between race and nationalism in American literature.
Notes
Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 05 Oct 2015).
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-292) and index.
Language note
English
Contents
  • Higher law in the 1850s
  • The look of higher law: Harriet Beecher Stowe's antislavery fiction
  • Cosmopolitan constitutionalism: Emerson and Douglass
  • The positivist alternative
  • Charles Chesnutt and Moorfield Storey: citizenship and the flux of contract.
Other title(s)
Race, Citizenship, & Law in American Literature
ISBN
  • 1-107-12434-4
  • 1-280-16226-0
  • 0-511-11981-X
  • 0-511-04185-3
  • 0-511-15662-6
  • 0-511-32549-5
  • 0-511-48547-6
  • 0-511-04434-8
OCLC
475916622
Statement on language in description
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