The specification of human actions in St. Thomas Aquinas [electronic resource] / Joseph Pilsner.

Author
Pilsner, Joseph [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2006.
Description
1 online resource (286 p.)

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Oxford theological monographs. [More in this series]
Summary note
Thomas Aquinas believed that human actions have species, such as theft or almsgiving. A problem arises, however, concerning his teaching on how such moral kinds are determined. Aquinas uses five different terms - end, object, matter, circumstance, and motive - to identify what gives species to human actions. Although similarities in meaning can be discerned between certain of these terms, apparent differences between others make it difficult to grasp how all five could refer to whatspecifies human actions. Joseph Pilsner examines and compares Aquinas's understanding of these five terms to see
Notes
Description based upon print version of record.
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (p. [247]-255) and index.
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
Language note
English
Contents
  • Human actions and Aquinas's moral theory
  • Two fundamental types of specification
  • End
  • Object
  • Matter
  • Circumstance
  • Motive
  • Proximate and remote ends.
ISBN
  • 0-19-160869-6
  • 1-281-15422-9
  • 1-4356-3125-0
  • 9786611154226
  • 0-19-153666-0
OCLC
742333471
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