Babylonian Witchcraft Literature: Case Studies I. Tzvi Abusch.

Author
Abusch, I. Tzvi [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Εdition
Second edition.
Published/​Created
  • Brown Judaic Studies 2020
  • Atlanta : Scholars Press, 2020.
  • ©2020.
Description
1 online resource (xviii, 154 p. ) Grayscale Illustration

Details

Related name
Series
Brown judaic studies; 132
Restrictions note
Open Access
Summary note
The studies in this volume focus on individual Babylonian magical texts while developing an overall understanding of these texts as a whole. Part One follows a diachronic approach, Part Two a synchronic one. In this sense, the studies are to be viewed broadly: while unravelling knots in individual texts, they highlight certain issues and exemplify some solutions for common problems in traditional Mesopotamian therapeutic literature.
Notes
The text of this book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/. To use this book, or parts of this book, in any way not covered by the license, please contact Brown Judaic Studies, Brown University, Box 1826, Providence, RI 02912.
Funding information
Open access edition funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Humanities Open Book Program.
Source of description
Description based on print version record.
Language note
English
Contents
  • Part I: Secondary Developments and Synthetic Growth in Akkadian Incantations and Prayers: Some Case Studies in Literary and Textual History
  • Part II: Maqlú I 1-36: An Interpretation.
  • Introduction
  • Problem, Hyphothesis and Illustration
  • Maqlú VII 119-146 and Related Texts
  • KAR 26 and EMS 12
  • Excursus
  • Declaration of Innocence and Repudiation of Witch's Accusation
  • Behavior of Witch: Verbal Adversaries and Witchcraft
  • Meaning of I 1-36 and Observations on Maqlú I 73-121.
ISBN
1-946527-42-4
OCLC
1154507034
Doi
  • 10.26300/fgz1-az68
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