Japan and natural disasters : prevention and risk management / Jean-François Heimburger.

Author
Heimburger, Jean-François [Browse]
Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
London : ISTE Ltd ; Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2018.
Description
xviii, 206 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Series
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references (pages 183-201) and index.
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 From Hazard to Disaster
  • 1.1. Hazard, vulnerability and risk
  • 1.2. Disaster
  • ch. 2 Earth and Fire
  • 2.1. Earthquakes
  • 2.1.1. Japan, principal seismic country
  • 2.1.2. The effects of earthquakes
  • 2.2. Volcanoes
  • 2.2.1. Japan, principal volcanic country
  • 2.2.2. Volcanic risks
  • 2.2.3. The benefits of volcanoes
  • ch. 3 Air and Water
  • 3.1. Strong winds
  • 3.1.1. Typhoons, spring winds and tornados
  • 3.1.2. Risks related to wind
  • 3.1.3. The benefits of wind
  • 3.2. Rainfall and snowfall
  • 3.2.1. Intense rains and flood risk
  • 3.2.2. Snow
  • 3.3. Heat waves
  • 3.3.1. The heat island phenomenon
  • 3.3.2. Damage related to heat
  • ch. 4 Disaster Prevention
  • 4.1. Concepts related to disaster prevention
  • 4.2. Laws, plans and budgets
  • 4.3. Business continuity plans
  • ch. 5 Risk Mitigation
  • 5.1. Hazard-proof buildings and residences
  • 5.1.1. In modern Japan
  • 5.1.2. The present day
  • 5.2. Securing critical infrastructure
  • 5.2.1. A predominantly overhead electrical grid
  • 5.2.2. The gas distribution network
  • 5.2.3. A water distribution system that is difficult to replace
  • 5.2.4. Securing shinkansen high-speed lines
  • 5.3. The battle against fires
  • 5.3.1. A variable risk
  • 5.3.2. Tokyo: a giant tinderbox
  • 5.3.3. Taking into account the risk of factory fires
  • 5.4. The fight against flooding
  • 5.4.1. The fight against coastal flooding
  • 5.4.2. The fight against flood rains
  • 5.5. The fight against mass movements
  • 5.6. The fight against heat islands
  • 5.7. The safety of nuclear power plants
  • 5.7.1. Establishing new regulations
  • 5.7.2. Confronting volcanic eruptions
  • 5.7.3. Facing earthquake shocks and tsunamis
  • 5.7.4. Facing heavy rains
  • ch. 6 Disaster Preparedness
  • 6.1. Prevention maps and signage
  • 6.2. Protection measures and storage
  • 6.3. Training, exercises and commemorations
  • 6.3.1. School education on disaster prevention
  • 6.3.2. Education on disaster prevention for everyone
  • 6.3.3. Commemorations
  • 6.4. Risk awareness
  • 6.4.1. Among Japanese people
  • 6.4.2. Among foreigners
  • ch. 7 Prediction, Monitoring, Warning and Preventive Evacuation
  • 7.1. Long-term forecasting
  • 7.1.1. Forecasting earthquakes: an impossible dream?
  • 7.1.2. Eruptions: limited forecasting
  • 7.1.3. The long-term forecasting of meteorological phenomena
  • 7.2. Monitoring and short-term forecasting
  • 7.2.1. Meteorological monitoring and forecasting
  • 7.2.2. Monitoring waterways
  • 7.2.3. Monitoring mass movements
  • 7.2.4. The detection of seismic and tsunami waves
  • 7.2.5. Monitoring volcanic activity
  • 7.3. Warnings
  • 7.3.1. Earthquake warnings
  • 7.3.2. Tsunami warnings
  • 7.3.3. Warning in case of volcanic eruption
  • 7.3.4. Warnings in case of meteorological phenomena
  • 7.3.5. The new emergency warning system
  • 7.4. Preventive evacuation
  • 7.4.1. Before a violent earthquake
  • 7.4.2. Hesitation to evacuate after a violent earthquake in anticipation of tsunami or a fire
  • 7.4.3. In case of risk of intense rainfall: to evacuate or not to evacuate?
  • 7.4.4. Evacuating in the face of volcanic dangers
  • 7.4.5. People requiring special attention
  • 7.4.6. Relocation
  • ch. 8 Crisis Management
  • 8.1. Mobilization of the authorities
  • 8.1.1. Crisis management centers
  • 8.1.2. Mobilization of rescue teams
  • 8.1.3. Management of dead bodies
  • 8.2. Mobilization of residents
  • 8.2.1. Neighborhood communities and local associations
  • 8.2.2. The actions of volunteers
  • 8.3. The circulation of information
  • 8.3.1. Social networks
  • 8.3.2. Rumors
  • 8.3.3. Media coverage
  • 8.4. Evacuation
  • 8.4.1. The initial period in the evacuation centers
  • 8.4.2. Mental health
  • 8.4.3. Temporary care of non-residents
  • ch. 9 Restoration and Reconstruction
  • 9.1. Rebuilding the lives of disaster victims
  • 9.1.1. Life in evacuation centers
  • 9.1.2. Security in devastated areas
  • 9.1.3. Settlement in temporary housing
  • 9.1.4. Prolonged stays in temporary housing
  • 9.1.5. Financial tools for reconstructing the lives of disaster victims
  • 9.1.6. Moral and psychological support
  • 9.2. Restoration and reconstruction of infrastructure
  • 9.2.1. Responsibilities and financing
  • 9.2.2. Waste management
  • 9.2.3. Restoration of vital infrastructure
  • 9.2.4. Restoration of public institutions: the example of schools
  • 9.2.5. Restoration of businesses
  • 9.2.6. Managing reconstruction costs
  • 9.3. Demographic and economic development
  • 9.4. Political consequences
  • 9.5. Memory.
ISBN
  • 1786303701 (hardback)
  • 9781786303707 (hardback)
OCLC
1050337076
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