Growing income inequalities : economic analyses / edited by Joël Hellier and Nathalie Chusseau.

Format
Book
Language
English
Published/​Created
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
Description
xvi, 325 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.

Details

Subject(s)
Related name
Bibliographic references
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: pt. I Where Do We Stand? Why Is It So? -- 1.Growing Income Inequalities in Advanced Countries / Michel Dumont -- 1.1.Introduction -- 1.2.Stylized facts -- 1.2.1.Growing wage inequality -- 1.2.2.Growing income inequality -- 1.2.3.Globalization and North-South trade -- 1.2.4.A major technological change -- 1.2.5.Changes in labour market institutions: more flexibility -- 1.2.6.Changes in the labour supply: a general skill upgrading -- 1.3.The demand-supply-institution framework -- 1.4.The three explanations and their empirical relevance -- 1.4.1.North-South trade and globalization -- 1.4.2.Exogenous skill-biased technological change -- 1.4.3.Changes in (labour market) institutions -- 1.4.4.Taxes -- 1.5.Combined explanations -- 1.5.1.Trade-induced technological change -- 1.5.2.Skill supply-induced technological change -- 1.5.3.Institution-induced technological change -- 1.5.4.Technology-induced offshoring --
  • Contents note continued: 1.5.5.Labour market polarization and trade-in-tasks models -- 1.6.Concluding remarks -- 2.Inequality in Emerging Countries / Joel Hellier -- 2.1.Introduction -- 2.2.Inequality in emerging countries: what the data say -- 2.2.1.Asian countries -- 2.2.2.Latin America -- 2.2.3.Other emerging countries -- 2.2.4.An inconclusive diagnosis -- 2.3.Traditional explanations: Kuznets versus Heckscher-Ohlin -- 2.3.1.Kuznets' prediction: the inverted-U inequality curve -- 2.3.2.The HOS prediction: decreasing inequality -- 2.3.3.The combination of both explanations -- 2.4.New explanations -- 2.4.1.The cornering of new skill-intensive goods -- 2.4.2.Technological transfers -- 2.4.3.Changes in the sectoral structure with non-tradable goods -- 2.4.4.FDI and capital imports from the North -- 2.4.5.Intermediate emerging countries -- 2.4.6.Growing South and technological catching up -- 2.4.7.Assessment -- 2.5.Empirical evidence -- 2.5.1.Methods --
  • Contents note continued: 2.5.2.Assessing the Kuznets hypothesis -- 2.5.3.Overall estimations -- 2.5.4.Asian countries -- 2.5.5.Latin America -- 2.5.6.Other countries -- 2.6.Conclusion -- 3.The Working Poor / Ekaterina Kalugina -- 3.1.Introduction -- 3.2.The working poor: definitions -- 3.2.1.Poverty and activity -- 3.2.2.The two-level definition of in-work poverty -- 3.2.3.American versus European definition -- 3.3.Empirical analyses: data and methods -- 3.3.1.Data -- 3.3.2.Methods -- 3.3.3.Magnitude of in-work poverty -- 3.4.The main characteristics of the working poor -- 3.4.1.Professional characteristics -- 3.4.2.Personal characteristics -- 3.4.3.Family characteristics -- 3.4.4.Institutional and country characteristics -- 3.4.5.A synthesis -- 3.5.Conclusions and policy implications -- pt. II Globalization, Technical Change and Inequality -- 4.The North-South HOS Model, Inequality and Globalization / Joel Hellier -- 4.1.Introduction --
  • Contents note continued: 4.2.Globalization and inequality: stylized facts -- 4.3.The traditional NS-HOS model and its shortfalls -- 4.3.1.The NS-HOS model -- 4.3.2.Stylized facts against the NS-HOS model -- 4.4.The NS-HOS model outside the diversification cone -- 4.4.1.The diversification cone -- 4.4.2.Globalization -- 4.4.3.The three stages of globalization, specialization and inequality -- 4.5.Wage rigidity -- 4.5.1.Minimum wage in the HOS model: the Davis approach and extensions -- 4.5.2.Efficiency wages in the HOS approach -- 4.6.Technological differences and technical change -- 4.6.1.A productivity gap identical in both sectors -- 4.6.2.Productivity catching-up -- 4.6.3.Technological transfer -- 4.6.4.Technological bias -- 4.7.International outsourcing -- 4.7.1.Segmentation and international outsourcing: definitions -- 4.7.2.Segmentation in the NS-HOS model -- 4.7.3.Factor intensities -- 4.8.Further extensions -- 4.8.1.Factor dynamics in the HOS model --
  • Contents note continued: 4.8.2.The impact of skill upgrading -- 4.8.3.Capital-skill complementarlty -- 4.8.4.The NS-HOS model with a continuum of goods -- 4.9.General assessment and conclusion -- 5.Is there a Trade-off between Wage Inequality and Unemployment? / Michel Dumont -- 5.1.Introduction -- 5.2.Inequality and unemployment: some of the facts -- 5.3.Theoretical arguments -- 5.3.1.The basic theoretical framework -- 5.3.2.Firing costs and minimum wage -- 5.3.3.Matching and frictional unemployment -- 5.3.4.Efficiency wages -- 5.3.5.Cross-country differences -- 5.4.Empirical evidence -- 5.4.1.The unemployment-inequality relationship -- 5.4.2.Effects of institutions on inequality and unemployment taken separately -- 5.4.3.Combined impact of institutions on Inequality and unemployment -- 5.5.Conclusion -- pt. III Inequality, Institutions and the Labour Markets -- 6.Growing Inequalities, Globalization and Trade Unions / Glenn Rayp -- 6.1.Introduction --
  • Contents note continued: 6.2.The impact of globalization upon labour bargaining -- 6.2.1.Aims and scopes of labour market bargaining: a short review -- 6.2.2.Globalization and bargaining when labour demand elasticity increases -- 6.2.3.Globalization and bargaining when labour demand elasticity decreases -- 6.3.Globalization and bargaining; empirical evidence -- 6.3.1.The Impact of globalization on the size of rents -- 6.3.2.The impact of globalization on the union's bargaining power -- 6.4.Conclusions -- 7.Efficiency Wages and Inequality / Vesna Stavrevska -- 7.1.Introduction -- 7.2.Sources of efficiency wages -- 7.2.1.The health model -- 7.2.2.The shirking model -- 7.2.3.The labour turnover model -- 7.2.4.The adverse selection model -- 7.2.5.The fair wage model -- 7.3.Formal analysis of the efficiency wage model -- 7.3.1.The Solow Condition -- 7.3.2.The specific form of the effort function -- 7.3.3.The choice of the reference wage -- 7.4.Within-country inequality --
  • Contents note continued: 7.4.1.Inequality within the working population -- 7.4.2.Efficiency wages and inequality at the national level -- 7.5.Inequality between nations -- 7.6.Conclusion -- pt. IV Inequality, Education and Growth -- 8.Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality / B. Ben-Halima -- 8.1.Introduction -- 8.2.Stylized facts -- 8.2.1.General skill upgrading -- 8.2.2.Increasing inequality between skilled and unskilled workers -- 8.2.3.Intergenerational mobility -- 8.3.Intergenerational mobility analyses -- 8.3.1.Education functions -- 8.3.2.The education decision -- 8.3.3.Long-term human capital profiles -- 8.4.Long-term skill convergence -- 8.4.1.The basic convergence models -- 8.4.2.Credit constraint and low mobility -- 8.5.Under-education traps -- 8.5.1.Fixed cost of education -- 8.5.2.Credit market imperfection combined with another constraint -- 8.5.3.S-shaped education functions -- 8.5.4.Local externalities -- 8.5.5.Education systems --
  • Contents note continued: 8.5.6.History matters -- 8.6.Empirical evidence -- 8.6.1.Methods -- 8.6.2.Income intergenerational mobility -- 8.6.3.Human capital intergenerational mobility -- 8.7.Conclusion -- 9.Inequality, Growth and Welfare: The Main Links / Stephane Lambrecht -- 9.1.Introduction -- 9.2.The impact of development on inequality: Kuznets revisited -- 9.2.1.Kuznets inverted-U curve: bases, interpretations and extensions -- 9.2.2.Empirical evidence -- 9.2.3.From an inverted-U to a tiide-shaped curve? -- 9.3.The impact of inequality on growth -- 9.3.1.Physical capital: inequality is good for growth -- 9.3.2.Human and social capital: inequality can be harmful to growth -- 9.3.3.Empirical evidence -- 9.4.Redistribution, educational policy and growth -- 9.4.1.The negative impact of redistribution -- 9.4.2.The political economy of redistribution -- 9.4.3.Redistribution, education and human-capital accumulation -- 9.5.Welfare, growth and Inequality -- 9.5.1.Efficient markets --
  • Contents note continued: 9.5.2.Market inefficiencies -- 9.6.Conclusion.
ISBN
  • 9780230303423 (hbk) :
  • 0230303420 (hbk) :
OCLC
824702490
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