Princeton University Library Catalog

Revolution : the event in postwar fiction / Matthew Wilkens.

Author:
Wilkens, Matthew, 1974- [Browse]
Format:
Book
Language:
English
Published/​Created:
  • Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016.
  • ©2016
Description:
x, 161 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary note:
Socially, politically, and artistically, the 1950s make up an odd interlude between the first half of the twentieth century-still tied to the problems and orders of the Victorian era and Gilded Age-and the pervasive transformations of the later sixties. In Revolution, Matthew Wilkens argues that postwar fiction functions as a fascinating model of revolutionary change. Uniting literary criticism, cultural analysis, political theory, and science studies, Revolution reimagines the years after World War II as at once distinct from the decades surrounding them and part of a larger-scale series of rare, revolutionary moments stretching across centuries. Focusing on the odd mix of allegory, encyclopedism, and failure that characterizes fifties fiction, Wilkens examines a range of literature written during similar times of crisis, in the process engaging theoretical perspectives from Walter Benjamin and Fredric Jameson to Bruno Latour and Alain Badiou alongside readings of major novels by Ralph Ellison, William Gaddis, Doris Lessing, Jack Kerouac, Thomas Pynchon, and others.
Bibliographic references:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 131-156) and index.
Contents:
The fifties on their own -- The structure of literary revolutions -- Allegory -- Event -- The encyclopedia as object and metaphor -- Failure and novelty in postwar fiction -- Allegory, encyclopedism, and postwar america -- Ellison's impure manifesto -- Integration and disorder in The golden notebook.
Subject(s):
American fiction20th centuryHistory and criticism [Browse]
Form/​Genre:
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
ISBN:
  • 9781421420875 ((hardcover ; : alk. paper))
  • ((electronic))
  • 1421420872 ((hardcover ; : alk. paper))
LCCN:
2016002108
OCLC:
946031625
Other views:
Staff view