Princeton University Library Catalog

Exploring physics with computer animation and PhysGL / T.J. Bensky.

Author:
Bensky, T. J. [Browse]
Format:
Book
Language:
English
Published/​Created:
  • San Rafael [California] (40 Oak Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94903, USA) : Morgan & Claypool Publishers, [2016]
  • Bristol [England] (Temple Circus, Temple Way, Bristol BS1 6HG, UK) : IOP Publishing, [2016]
Description:
1 online resource (various pagings) : illustrations (some color).
Series:
Biographical/​Historical note:
Tom Bensky is a physics professor at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, CA (USA), known as 'Cal Poly'. He has had a lifelong interest in computer graphics and enjoys teaching a range of classes from ASTRO-101 to advanced labs. His research interests include precision time-keeping, community outreach with physics, and international education.
Summary note:
This book shows how the web-based PhysGL programming environment (http://physgl.org) can be used to teach and learn elementary mechanics (physics) using simple coding exercises. The book's theme is that the lessons encountered in such a course can be used to generate physics-based animations, providing students with compelling and self-made visuals to aid their learning. Topics presented are parallel to those found in a traditional physics text, making for straightforward integration into a typical lecture-based physics course. Users will appreciate the ease at which compelling OpenGL-based graphics and animations can be produced using PhysGL, as well as its clean, simple language constructs. The author argues that coding should be a standard part of lower-division STEM courses, and provides many anecdotal experiences and observations, that include observed benefits of the coding work.
Notes:
  • "Version: 20161001"--Title page verso.
  • "A Morgan & Claypool publication as part of IOP Concise Physics"--Title page verso.
Target audience:
Undergraduate and graduate physics and science students and professionals.
Source of description:
Title from PDF title page (viewed on November 2, 2016).
Contents:
  • Preface -- 1. Using computer animation to learn physics -- 1.1. What is computer animation? -- 1.2. Why computer animation with physics? -- 1.3. Why computer animation in a course on physics? -- 1.4. Like video games?
  • 2. A taste of using computer for physics -- 2.1. PhysGL : easy computer graphics in the cloud -- 2.2. What-if calculations -- 2.3. A motion diagram -- 2.4. Our own motion diagram -- 2.5. More from the computer -- 2.6. Even more from the computer -- 2.7. What about an animation? -- 2.8. Different accelerations on an object
  • 3. Preliminaries : things you should know -- 3.1. Mathematics -- 3.2. The idea of a function -- 3.3. Vectors : more than 'magnitude and direction'
  • 4. Getting started with simple programming -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Skeleton code -- 4.3. Basic PhysGL programming -- 4.4. Structure of the skeleton code -- 4.5. The if statement -- 4.6. Doing math with PhysGL
  • 5. Drawing with PhysGL -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Coordinate system -- 5.3. Drawing examples -- 5.4. Colors -- 5.5. Drawing physics-related objects -- 5.6. Creating plots
  • 6. One-dimensional motion -- 6.1. Introduction and goals -- 6.2. The physics -- 6.3. Projects -- 6.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 7. Two-dimensional motion -- 7.1. Introduction and goals -- 7.2. The physics -- 7.3. Projects -- 7.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 8. Forces and Newton's laws (part I) -- 8.1. Introduction and goals -- 8.2. The physics -- 8.3. Projects -- 8.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 9. Forces and Newton's laws (part II) -- 9.1. Introduction and goals -- 9.2. The physics -- 9.3. Projects -- 9.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 10. Energy : kinetic, potential, conservation, and work -- 10.1. Introduction and goals -- 10.2. The physics -- 10.3. Projects -- 10.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 11. Momentum and conservation of momentum -- 11.1. Introduction and goals -- 11.2. The physics -- 11.3. Projects -- 11.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 12. Rotational motion -- 12.1. Introduction and goals -- 12.2. The physics -- 12.3. Projects -- 12.4. Wrap-up questions
  • 13. Torque, angular acceleration, and momentum -- 13.1. Introduction and goals -- 13.2. The physics -- 13.3. Projects
  • Appendices -- A. How do I ... -- B. Capstone project -- C. Benefits : insights and new pedagogical avenues.
Other format(s):
Also available in print.
Subject(s):
ISBN:
  • 9781681744254 (ebook)
  • 9781681744278 (mobi)
  • (print)
Doi:
  • 10.1088/978-1-6817-4425-4
Publisher:
Other views:
Staff view